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The 6 Best Watches of Spring 2012

Bulova Precisionist Champlain Collection

Precisionist Champlain Collection by Bulova

Rule #1: A watch with a quartz movement is simpler and far more accurate—and if the battery dies, you simply replace it. But if you’re looking for an heirloom, consider a mechanical watch with automatic movement. It’ll run you at least $600.

Tag Heuer Aquaracer 500m

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Aquaracer 500m chronograph by Tag Heuer

Rule #2:
Bigger is better, but only to a point. The face shouldn’t be wider than your wrist; something in the 42-to-44-millimeter range should be about right.

Seiko Sportura Alarm

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Sportura Alarm chronograph by Seiko

Rule #3:
Life is complicated enough. Don’t make it worse with a bunch of gauges and dials you won’t ever use.

Bell and Ross BR02-92 Phantom Rubber

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BR02-92 Phantom Rubber by Bell and Ross

Rule #4:
Speaking of which, unless you’re a scuba diver, anything more than ten meters of waterproofness is just for show.

Victorinox Swiss Army Airboss Automatic

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Airboss Automatic by Victorinox Swiss Army

5.
A rubber watchband is great because it can expand and contract as the temperature fluctuates. Just make sure it’s hypoallergenic.

Oris Carlos Coste Limited Edition Cenote Series

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Carlos Coste Limited Edition Cenote Series by Oris

Rule #6: For the bezel, steel is your best option. And remember this phrase: 316L surgical-grade. The superlow nickel content really is better for your skin. It’s not marketing hooey.

Rule #7: Neither is the superiority of a sapphire crystal. It’s the hardest and most scratch-resistant next to diamond.

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