5 of the Day’s Biggest Stories

Friday’s briefing

“The air pollution here is bad for Utah’s outdoor industry, and winter-sports tourism specifically, but it’s also bad for the health of anyone trying to make a life here: families, road-crew workers, businesspeople, and everyone breathing our state’s air." (Arches National Park / Flickr)

Outdoor Enthusiasts Ask EPA to Protect Utah Parks from Pollution

On Wednesday, more than 100 athletes and outdoor recreation companies sent a letter to the Environmental Protection Agency in an effort to protect Utah’s national parks from air pollution, according to a press release. The letter asked the EPA to enforce pollution control for Rocky Mountain Power’s coal-fired power plants, located in Hunter and Huntington. “The air pollution here is bad for Utah’s outdoor industry, and winter-sports tourism specifically,” professional skier Angel Collinson said in the release. “But it’s also bad for the health of anyone trying to make a life here: families, road-crew workers, businesspeople, and everyone breathing our state’s air.” The state’s outdoor recreation economy brings in about $12 billion per year.

New Climbing Grants to Replace Old Bolts, Anchors

The American Alpine Club and the Access Fund are giving $10,000 to climbing areas in Maine, California, Kentucky, and other states to replace unsafe bolts and anchors, Rock & Ice reported on Thursday. The money comes from the Anchor Replacement Fund program, which is in its first year. Climbing groups may apply for next year’s grants through the Access Fund. Applications are due in September 2016.

NOAA Releases Winter Forecast

This winter will bring a lot of rain, but not necessarily a lot of snow, the Guardian reported on Thursday. The winter forecast from the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration predicts that El Niño will mostly affect the United States, bringing rain and low temperatures to the South, dry weather to states in the Ohio Valley, and rain to California.

Malaria Transmission Is Shrinking (and Will Continue to Decrease)

Malaria transmission may be nonexistent by 2040, according to a new infographic by the Economist. The charts, published on Wednesday, show the growth of malaria-free countries from 1900 through predictions for the year 2040, when, according to a paper published by the United Nations and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, it is possible that malaria will be entirely eradicated. The Economist based the charts on data from the paper.

WATCH: Black Bear Walks Through Halls of School

On Wednesday, a black bear walked into Montana’s Bozeman High School, according to Backpacker. Nobody was injured, and police were able to get the bear out in three minutes. Watch the clip here:

More Adventure

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