AdventureBiking

Bike-Pack the White Rim Trail

A 92-mile ride above the Colorado and Green Rivers in Can­yonlands National Park

(Photo: Kevin Trageser/Redux)
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What it is: A three- or four-day, 92-mile ride above the Colorado and Green Rivers in Can­yonlands National Park.

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Why it’s worth it: Most people explore Canyonlands on foot. Riders on the White Rim Trail cover a bigger swath of the park—and although we don’t like to admit it, sticking to a nontechnical trail means appreciating what you’re riding through. In this case, the park’s famous geographical features: its arches, mesas, and thousand-foot cliffs.

How to prep: There are several ways to tackle the White Rim Trail. The most popular is to ride with 4x4 support, stopping each night at designated campsites. Other riders aim for two days and pull gear- and food-laden trailers. It’s also possible to ride the White Rim in a day without support. How fast you want to move will dictate your training, but all riders should be comfortable being on the bike for between six and eight hours a day. Make sure to reserve campsites well in advance. If you don’t plan to camp, you’ll still need a day-use permit.

 

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From Outside Magazine, May 2016
Filed To: National Parks
Lead Photo: Kevin Trageser/Redux
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