GearBiking

The Best Men's Bike Accessories of 2017

Make saddling up a bit more affordable. (Photo: Inga Hendrickson)
outside buyers guide

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Capable, killer-value tools to make saddling up a bit more affordable. 


MOUNTAIN

outside buyers guide
Evoc Race 3L. (Photo: Evoc)

Evoc Race 3L Hip Pack ($95)

Think of the Race 3L as insanely comfortable storage that hugs the hips and has just enough space for a spare tube, a pump, and a snack while keeping your back sweat-free. There are pockets for two bottles, or use the included 1.5-liter bladder.

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outside buyers guide
Mission Workshop Sector Quick-Dry jersey. (Photo: Mission Workshop)

Mission Workshop Sector Quick-Dry Jersey ($60)

The Sector pairs the comfort of your favorite T-shirt with a lightweight, open-knit mesh to keep you cool, dry, and decidedly under the radar.

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outside buyers guide
Northwave Outcross shoes. (Photo: Northwave)

Northwave Outcross Shoes ($110)

With a super-grippy Michelin rubber outsole, the Outcross is a walkable shoe with loads of low-key performance chops and some surprising Italian style. Sizing is on the roomy side, so those with slim feet should go for the Plus, which replaces the top strap with a ratchet.

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Lezyne Micro Floor Drive XL pump. (Photo: Lezyne)

Lezyne Micro Floor Drive XL Pump ($60)

We used to advocate for the smallest pump possible, but with the advent of high­volume tires, we never leave home without the burly Micro Floor Drive XL. It’s a machined­aluminum bazooka that fills up big rubber fast.

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Troy Lee Designs Skyline Ripstop shorts. (Photo: Troy Lee Designs)

Troy Lee Designs Skyline Ripstop Shorts ($75)

Not only is the Skyline Ripstop light, quick to dry, and tear-resistant, but it’s also chill enough to wear off the bike, with a classic, casual boardshorts look. 

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Giro Chronicle MIPS helmet. (Photo: Courtesy of Giro)

Giro Chronicle MIPS Helmet ($100)

The Chronicle MIPS is almost a carbon copy of the top-tier Montaro: it’s just a hair heavier and has slightly smaller vents.

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ROAD

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Nalgene Draft bottle. (Photo: Nalgene)

Nalgene Draft Bottle ($11)

An innovative take on the old standby, the Draft has a high-flow valve and a 90-degree cap that twists open, keeping water from spraying out.

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Velocio Ultralight jersey. (Photo: Velocio)

Velocio Ultralight Jersey and Signature Bibs ($140 and $220)

The airy Ultralight feels as close to going shirtless as is possible in a form-fitting top. The Signature bibs feature stretchy crisscrossed straps and a seamless pad that kept us pain-free for five hours.

Jersey:

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Bib:

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Shimano RC7 shoes. (Photo: Shimano)

Shimano RC7 Shoes ($200)

You could get the RC9, Shimano’s top-shelf road racer, but the RC7 has a near identical supple upper, stiff carbon sole, and grippy heel cup—for half the price. The main difference: one Boa closure instead of two. But we still found the fit to be plenty dialed in. 

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outside buyers guide
Fabric FLR30 light. (Photo: Fabric)

Fabric FL30 and FLR30 Lights ($40 each)

For visibility on the road, we depend on these two 30-lumen lights from Fabric. Each is about the size of a tube of lip balm and mounts pretty much anywhere on your helmet or bike. The taillight, with a built-in ­accelerometer, blinks faster or slower depending on your speed.

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outside buyers guide
Lezyne Super GPS computer. (Photo: Lezyne)

Lezyne Super GPS Computer ($150)

This is arguably the best deal going in a bar-mount computer. It’s a refined unit, with ANT+ and Bluetooth Smart connectivity, power compatibility, and accurate turn-by-turn navigation.

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outside buyers guide
Bell Stratus MIPS helmet. (Photo: Bell)

Bell Stratus MIPS Helmet ($150)

Thanks to a slightly different construction, the Stratus is 35 ­percent cheaper than Bell’s pro-level Zephyr. Yet it’s almost identical, right down to the low-profile MIPS protection.

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From 2017 Summer Buyer's Guide
Filed To: Summer Buyer's GuideBiking
Lead Photo: Inga Hendrickson
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