We don’t need no stinking sleeves

vests
(Courtesy Big Agnes)

Big Agnes Thorpe ($180)

“Just substantial enough to maintain a comfortable core without sending my body temperature into overshoot,” one tester said of the Thrope. This pullover’s PrimaLoft Gold Active insulation and stretchy armholes for unfettered movement have made it a key part of our layering strategy for high-output days in the mountains.

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vests
(Courtesy Marmot)

Marmot Origins ($200)

We like vests because they’re freeing, with no fabric around the arms to constrict. But that doesn’t mean we’re opposed to adding that fabric back elsewhere. Take the Origins, which comes with a water-resistant hood. The large baffles are stuffed with 700-fill down, and the whole thing packs into its own pocket when the mercury rises.

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vests
(Courtesy Canada Goose)

Canada Goose Freestyle ($425)

Admittedly pricey for a vest, the Freestyle is exceptionally comfortable, with a body-hugging fit, a long hem in back, and a suede liner. Canada Goose went easy on the military styling it’s known for, so you won’t look like a Special Forces wannabe when you wear it around town. But with burly outer fabric, 625-fill duck down, and big drop pockets, the Freestyle is ready for action nonetheless.

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vests
(Courtesy Toad & Co.)

Toad&Co Allie Fleece ($129)

At 31 inches long, the Allie provides ample cov­erage whether you’re chilling on a snowy park bench or enjoying late-night après. The plush fleece exterior feels buttery smooth, while the Tencel-polyester interior adds stretchy comfort and moisture-wicking prowess. Just don’t take it ice climbing—the Allie is best at mild urban pursuits.

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vests
(Courtesy Smartwool)

Smartwool Smartloft 60 Hoodie ($160)

Like most things made by Smartwool, this vest has technical chops without making you look like an outdork. It’s a little loose around the hips, which testers appreciated, and recycled wool insulation, merino side panels, and DWR-treated nylon on the front and in back provide warmth, weather resistance, and breathability.

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vests
(Courtesy Eddie Bauer)

Eddie Bauer EverTherm Down ($199)

This vest sits halfway between the Canada Goose and the Big Agnes, pairing the heat retention of down with the low profile of a synthetic, courtesy of Eddie Bauer’s Thindown insulation (down clusters pressed into a sheet). The EverTherm can be worn on its own on mellow days, but the thin build makes it perfect for layering.

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Après

The Best Jackets of 2019

Winter adventure starts here (Courtesy Eddie Bauer) Eddie Bauer BC EverTherm Down ($499) If you’re a cold-weather backcountry adventurer, you need a fail-safe layer stashed in your pack—the lighter the better. Warm enough for an emergency alpine bivy and waterproof enough to handle drizzly conditions, Eddie Bauer’s BC EverTherm is your superlight safety kit. At just 1.2 pounds, it has the best warmth-to-weight ratio of any waterproof puffy we tested. The secret is Eddie Bauer’s proprietary Thindown insulation, which debuted last year and is made of ultralight down clusters that are pressed into a continuous sheet rather than blown

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Après

The Best Adventure Blankets of 2019

Six cozy throws, from plush to practical   (Courtesy Klymit) Klymit Versa ($80) Truly adaptable, the Versa goes from blanket to lightweight sleeping bag with a series of snaps and the pull of a cinch cord. With four insulated hand pockets and a footbox, it’s pretty much all you need to keep your extremities warm during picnics on brisk autumn evenings. Buy Now (Courtesy Coalatree) Coalatree Kachula ($79) Hey, all you overlanders: this is the blanket you want in the back of your Tacoma. With a ripstop-nylon bottom coated in a DWR finish, it’s our first choice when we have

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Après

The Best Base and Midlayers of 2019

Tights and insulators to keep you warm and feeling strong (Courtesy Direct Alpine) Direct Alpine Mountain Series Bora Jacket ($230) We appreciate an athletically cut jacket that doesn’t bind up. No wonder the Bora (women’s pictured) is at the top of our list—the waist flares and the arms moved with us as we swung our ski poles. Supple Polartec Alpha Direct on the interior wicked moisture and kept us warm on the slopes. Buy Now (Courtesy Corbeaux) Corbeaux 3/4 Centennial Leggings ($89) Layered under ski pants, the polyester-­spandex Centennial (men’s pictured) kicks ass. “Felt great against my skin, and

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Après

The Best Winter Workwear of 2019

Burly clothes can still be comfy (Courtesy Voormi) Voormi San Juan Jacket ($299) To fight off any storm, the San Juan pairs old-school cotton-poly with Cordura reinforcements and a weatherproof membrane. The result is as breathable as canvas, offers greater durability, and doesn’t mind being put through the wringer. Buy Now (Courtesy Hestra) Hestra Njord Gloves ($105) Removable merino liners set these goatskin gloves apart. Wear them unlined on warm days, then slip in the merino when temperatures sink. Buy Now (Courtesy Darn Tough) Darn Tough Paul Bunyan Socks ($26) These over-the-calf, full-cushion socks are made of extra-fine knit

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Après

The Best Ski Pants of 2019

Slick trousers for powder-day overachievers (Courtesy Flylow) Flylow Smythe ($450) Our male testers unanimously agreed that these were the most comfortable bibs in our test, thanks to the roomy cut. They’re streamlined, too: big vents, well-placed pockets, and nothing else. Buy Now (Courtesy Black Diamond) Black Diamond Recon Stretch ($329) Whether on long tours or for big objectives, these pants (women’s pictured) deliver. Black Diamond’s proprietary waterproof-breathable membrane keeps the elements out, while four-way stretch, articulated knees, and offset side venting allow for all the backcountry booty dropping you desire. Men's Women's (Courtesy Marmot) Marmot BL Pro ($600) The nylon

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