Because boot-packing takes too long

alpinist-skins-new.jpg
(Courtesy G3)

G3 Alpinist Plus Glide Skins ($184)

G3 tweaked the mohair-to-nylon ratio in its Alpinist skins to suit a variety of conditions and terrain. Our favorite: the 70 percent mohair, 30 percent nylon Glide. It’s downright zippy on low-angle tours.

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splitboarding
(Courtesy Arc'teryx)

Arc’teryx Beta SL Jacket ($299)

A quality shell is a must on any backcountry mission, even if it mostly lives in your pack. Arc’teryx’s Beta SL tips the scales at less than 11 ounces. And with its cinchable hood, slim fit, and two-layer Gore-Tex, we were more than happy to bust it out when necessary.

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splitboarding
(Courtesy Salomon)

Salomon Pillow Talk Splitboard ($800)

Terrible name, killer deck. Salomon took its women’s all-mountain Pillow Talk, cut it in half, and gave it a new core. The flex is on the soft side, but the board handled well in mixed conditions.

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splitboarding
(Courtesy Dakine)

Dakine Poacher R.A.S. 26 Pack ($210)

With a whistle on the sternum strap (smart), a hydration sleeve in the main pack (nifty), and a rear-entry zipper (essential), the Poacher is full featured. But what we liked most is compatibility with Mammut’s top-end R.A.S. airbag ($490).

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splitboarding
(Courtesy Salomon)

Salomon Speedway Splitboard ($900)

“Super fun, super light, very maneuverable,” said one tester. With a wide nose that gives it great float in soft snow, the Speedway is ideal for beginner or intermediate splitboarders who focus on powder.

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splitboarding
(Courtesy Black Diamond)

Black Diamond Dawn Patrol Ski Touring Pants ($199)

These touring pants are made of four-way-stretch soft-shell material. They give in all the right places, and they’re breathable while still providing insulation. The tailored fit is a plus: call us hipsters, but we don’t like tangling our crampons in our pant legs.

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splitboarding
(Courtesy Burton)

Burton Hitchhiker Bindings ($460)

The Hitchhiker is a collaboration between Spark, arguably the first name in split bindings, and Burton, arguably the first name in the fixed kind. The aluminum baseplates are light but durable, and the lever that releases the toe to switch to ride mode is glove-friendly.

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splitboarding
(Courtesy Vans)

Vans Verse Boots ($390)

With a customizable insulating liner and a waterproof zipper shroud, the Verse is luxe. Hardy inserts can be removed to soften the boots for the climb up and replaced to stiffen them for the ride down.

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Après

The Best Skis of 2019

A complete revamp of a classic leads the cream of the crop from our test in Snowbird, Utah (Courtesy Völkl) Völkl M5 Mantra ($825) How do you freshen up a ski you’ve been making for 12 years and already redesigned four times? You blow it up entirely. That’s what Völkl’s German engineers did with the brand-new M5. Their goal: keep one of the most versatile all-mountain skis in history relevant. Not only did they succeed, but they created the best ski of the year. How? By bringing back underfoot camber for better glide and rebound, decreasing the width (from

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Après

The Best Alpine Ski Boots of 2019

Comfort and performance in a lightweight package   (Courtesy Nordica) Nordica Promachine 130 ($849) Best for All-Mountain Racing The Promachine’s anatomically shaped liner and shell, which seamlessly blends plastics of varying thickness, improve feel without compromising capability. This helps translate the subtlest movements from your feet to the ski, making it our favorite for tight trees. Buy Now (Courtesy K2) K2 Recon 120 ($650) Best for Gram Counters Just 3.6 pounds but hardly wimpy, the Recon is one of the lightest inbounds boots on the market. It drops weight by thinning the shell where strength isn’t crucial, like the sides and toe, but still

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Après

The Best Snowboards of 2019

Five decks that bring surf style to the slopes (Courtesy Weston) Weston Japow ($599) It’s no secret that snowboarders take inspiration from surfers. In everything from carving technique and aerial style to lingo and board shape, we’re closely aligned with our salty cousins. At Outside’s annual snowboard test at ­Crested Butte Mountain Resort in Colorado, more than 30 riders put 86 decks to the test in variable spring conditions, and the consensus was that, now more than ever, designers are encouraging a surfy approach to snowboarding. Case in point: the surf-inspired Weston Japow was our top-rated board this year,

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Après

The Best Alpine Touring Bindings of 2019

You’re only as good (and as safe) as your connection to your skis   (Courtesy Dynafit) Dynafit ST Rotation 10 ($600) Several years ago, the brand that launched the tech revolution in the eighties introduced a turntable heel to prevent pre-release. The new Rotation improves upon that model, with a centering function at the toe that makes lining up the back of your boot with the heelpiece more precise. 2.2 lbs Buy Now (Courtesy Salomon) Salomon Shift MNC ($650) The Shift, developed in collaboration with Atomic, is like no other binding ever made. It has an alpine-inspired step-in heel and

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Après

The Best Alpine Touring Ski Boots of 2019

The season’s backcountry boots demand to be pushed to the limit (Courtesy Scott) Scott Celeste III ($750) The latest edition of the women’s Celeste is roomier in the lower portion of the shell and in the cuff, making it a tester favorite. Scott kept the smooth forward flex from its previous design, so the Celeste performs more like a ski-mountaineering boot than a four-buckle powerhouse. With 60 degrees of motion, it climbed just as well. 2.7 lbs Buy Now (Courtesy Salomon) Salomon S/Lab MTN ($975) Updated with Salomon’s Custom Shell HD technology, the new S/Lab MTN is heat moldable,

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Après

The Best Nordic Skiing Gear of 2019

Hammer like the gods in this cross-country kit   (Courtesy Craft) Craft PrimaLoft Stow Light Jacket ($160) With 60-gram synthetic fill, this lightweight puffy is loose and breathable enough to keep you warm without overheating. Stuff it into its pocket when the mercury rises. Men's Women's (Courtesy Fischer) Fischer Twin Skin X-Lite EF Skis ($349) If kick waxing gets you down, invest in these skis with wee climbing skins in the bases. The X-Lite EFs aren’t as fast or light as race sticks, but they’re great for a mellow tour. Buy Now (Courtesy Start) Start Ultra Gel Wax ($28) Unlike typical

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Après

The Best Ski Poles of 2019

Six pairs of sticks that can keep up (Courtesy Salomon) Salomon MTN Carbon S3 ($150) Salomon’s ingenious wrist-release system—a hard tug pulls the strap free from the grip—means no worrying that your poles will turn into shoulder-separating leashes in the trees. Tough foam extends six inches below the grip for extra purchase when choking up, and the lower portion of the carbon shaft is reinforced with Kevlar for durability. Buy Now (Courtesy Grass Sticks) Grass Sticks Original Custom ($89) After burning through aluminum poles season after season, we invested in a pair of Grass Sticks. And we’ve used them

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Après

The Best Ski Helmets of 2019

Preferably one with gobs of comfort and safety features (Courtesy Sweet Protection) Sweet Protection Switcher MIPS ($249) After more than a dozen testers placed the Switcher on their noggins, all agreed that it was the most comfortable helmet they’d worn. It accommodated a wide range of head sizes (pressure points were nonexistent) and handled temperature swings with aplomb. We’re talking 50-­degree corn-harvesting days at Snowbird and ten-degree bone chillers with 60-mile-per-hour winds on the summit of Oregon’s Mount McLoughlin. Credit the abundance of vents—18 on top and two at the front—all of which can be micro-adjusted using a single

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Après

The Best Goggles of 2019

New lens designs are improving the view even on low-contrast days (Courtesy Atomic) Atomic Count 360° HD ($200) Dual-lens goggles have been the standard in winter sports since the 1960s. Just like with thermal windows, the air between the first and second lens has an insulating effect, reducing fog. But flaws inherent in that construction (refraction, image mirroring) have dogged designers. Despite advances, the view through a single lens is just better. Atomic solves this conundrum with the revolutionary Count 360° HD, which features two lenses fused together. Double-thick plastic compensates for the loss of that thermal air layer,

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