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2020 Winter Buyers Guide

The Best Gloves of 2020

Keep hands toasty and fingers functional with these sturdy mitts

(Photo: Inga Hendrickson)
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Dakine Team Baron Gore-Tex ($115)

gloves
(Photo: Courtesy Dakine)

Designed with input from Chris Benchetler, the Team Baron’s looks reference the freeskiing phenom’s love of some obscure psyche band from San Francisco. The exterior is a mix of stretchy soft shell and supple goatskin, making it the nimblest mitten we tested. Gore-Tex inserts lend waterproofing, and PrimaLoft Gold insulation boosts warmth.

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Flylow Maine Line ($65)

gloves
(Photo: Courtesy Flylow)

Mittens are great, until you need to fish something out of your pack. That’s why we’re fans of the Maine Line, with its separate index finger for improved dexterity and no loss of warmth. Nylon on the back of the hand lends flexibility, too.

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Leki Griffin Tune S Boa ($189)

gloves
(Photo: Courtesy Leki)

Skiers sick of constricting pole straps will rejoice: a D-loop between the thumb and index finger connects the Griffin to the pole. (Note: it works only with Leki’s Trigger sticks.) The supple combo of goatskin and soft shell facilitates movement.

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Helly Hansen Odin ($140)

gloves
(Photo: Courtesy Helly Hansen)

With its removable lining, this two-for-one glove is great for multi-season use. That soft-shell liner has a tacky palm for extra grip, and it’s warm enough to serve as a spring-skiing glove. Deploy the waterproof-breathable outer, with its goatskin palm, when the weather turns.

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Hestra Wakayama ($145)

gloves
(Photo: Courtesy Hestra)

Don’t let the styling fool you: the Wakayama is less retro than nowtro. The cowhide outer is treated with aniline oil for water resistance, and the wool lining is woven into loops like terry cloth, forming air pockets that trap warmth. The benefit: it doesn’t break down the way some synthetics do.

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Seirus Range LX ($120)

gloves
(Photo: Courtesy Serius)

Stuff too much insulation into a glove and you can kiss dexterity goodbye. So while the Range has a bit of pillow to it (thanks to comfy fleece and some PrimaLoft), Seirus uses a lining that reflects the warmth of your skin, similar to the emergency blankets found in first-aid kits.

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From Winter 2020 Buyer's Guide
Filed To: GlovesClothing and ApparelSnow SportsSkiing
Lead Photo: Inga Hendrickson
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