Destinations

Archive

Need something (or somebody) flown around Africa without a lot of questions? Can you pay with bricks of cash? Then you want old-school bush pilot Tim Roman, a man with Kurtzian ambitions, a deft touch on jungle runways, and a place on every smart dictator’s speed dial.

Nine Caribbean playgrounds heavy on the sports—and dead serious about kicking back

On a cosmic night of baseball Randy Wayne White joins the armada in San Francisco's McCovey Cove to fish for Barry Bond's record-breaking home-run ball

Don’t like to brag, but I have climbed Mount Everest 30 times. Everest The first time I climbed it, I was only ten years old. I was lucky to make it to the top. I didn’t know what I was doing. I was wearing only corduroys, a windbreaker, and…

New York City-based writer Patrick Symmes and Irish photographer Seamus Murphy scoured the Far East in search of the legendary city of Shambhala for the October 2007 feature story “The Kingdom of the Lotus.” Here, listen to a podcast interview with Symmes and see Murphy’s photo outtakes from the assignment.

In his September Out of Bounds column, "The Italian Job" columnist Eric Hansen tries to convince us that he did not waste our money on a trip to Italy, where, as near as we can tell, he just downed Chianti and gelato. Hansen reads his story, talks in a podcast interview, and shares his photos here.

Resort towns no more—move here before the masses do.

As you may have heard, they ski in Iran. As you may not have heard, the terrain is pretty sweet, there are dudes bouncing on the chairlifts, and The hills are alive with happy women in flowing robes. Can we make peace with this place Immediately?

Go farther faster, stay out all day, and don't carry a thing (except your credit card) on these five perfect, three-day hiking and biking adventures

Take one desert island, insert one strapping lad, and see how long he survives. That's the recipe for our half-starved, sunburnt castaway, who lived to tell the tale.

For the August 2007 feature story, “Powder Keg” we sent Josh Dean and Alex Tehrani to lay some tracks at the highest ski area…in Iran. Here, flip through some of Tehrani’s outtakes from their epic, see more images from his previous assignment for Outside, and read an interview with the…

Sometimes one culture just isn’t enough. Steeping yourself in the South of France is great, but drop in to an Asian-themed resort on a French island and you’ll leave feeling like a true global denizen. Here are three hotels that import their home country’s ethos. Banyan Tree…

Try summiting one of Southeast Alaska’s 16,000-foot peaks and you’ll run into a few potholes—literally. Thousands of pits (or moulins), up to 300 feet deep, scar 3.2 million glaciated acres of Wrangell–St. Elias National Park and Preserve, and more and more visitors are trading in a summit bid to rappel…

Discover the pleasure and pain of pro-caliber climbs with these U.S. mountain monsters

A Playboy bunny, massage tents, martinis, bootleg movies, high altitude golf. As correspondent Kevin Fedarko reports in the July 2007 feature story, "High Times" the scene at Everest Base Camp ain't what you'd expect. Here, listen to an audio version of the story and hear an interview with Fedarko.

Colorado River guide Michael Ghiglieri publishes irresistible books about the weird, wicked things that kill people in national parks. With a bestselling Grand Canyon necrology behind him and a new one on Yosemite coming out this spring, he talks to KEVIN FEDARKO about accidents, suicides, and murders—and why forensic gawking can actually

Conrad Anker heads back to Everest, in search of answers

At some point after puberty and before mortgage payments, that summer ritual our parents used to make us do became something we couldn't do without. And the rules have changed. Cars are faster, highways are better, and there's cool stuff—really cool stuff that doesn't involve buffets or Dollywood—just about everywhere. Stop sitting on those vacation d

In the June 2007 feature story “The Boomtown, the Gringo, the Girl, and Her Murder” Tony D’Souza reports on the murder trial of American ex-pat Eric Volz in Nicaragua. On March 26, 2007, after months of research and nearly two weeks of attempting to get access to Volz, Supreme Court…

In the June 2007 feature story "The Boomtown, the Gringo, the Girl, and Her Murder" Tony D'Souza reports on the trial of American Eric Volz in Nicaragua. Listen to D'Souza discuss the investigation in our podcast interview, see more of Jason Florio's photos of San Juan del Sur, and, coming soon, read a transcript of his two-hour prison talk

When a local beauty turned up dead in Nicaragua's San Juan del Sur, the dream of paradise became a nightmare for one expat American surfer. He got 30 years and, predictably, a media melee ensued. But Tony D'Souza was on the scene from day one. This is the story you haven't heard.

Are you in love with your home? We’re scouring the country to find the best places to live, work, and play for our annual Best Towns issue, and we want you to contribute. Tell us why we should pack up and move to your place by emailing us at…

In one of the cruelest marches in World War II, a battalion of American soldiers trekked through nearly impassable jungle in Papua New Guinea to battle the Japanese. Six decades later, JAMES CAMPBELL attempts to repeat the journey, and discovers a deadly trail, ravenous leeches, and a rare look into one of the last remote places on earth.

In the unlikeliest of places, in the waters off JFK airport in New York, IAN FRAZIER lands a few big fish with Captain Frank, a guide who matches his passion striper for striper and knows why fishing is connected to everything

Helicopter rescues on the summit of Everest may soon be reality. And the pilot won't be anywhere in sight.

Finding uncrowded bliss from Olympic to Acadia

There’s something sublime about a dip in a natural swimming hole, be it a lazy oxbow in a cool river, a hillside nook fed by a subterranean hot-spring, or a limestone bowl bored out by a 40-foot waterfall. “The swimming hole is the perfect outdoor experience,” says Pancho Doll, author…

In the May 2007 Outside feature story "Chasing Ghosts," writer James Campbell follows in the footsteps of American soldiers who trekked 130 miles through Papua New Guinea during World War II. Here, watch a trailer for the film, The Ghost Mountain Boys and see Philipp Engelhorn's photo outtakes from the trip.

It’s not like we needed another reason to love Moab. But we’ve got one: Utah’s red-rock mecca for adventure sports is pursuing one of the most ambitious green-energy policies of any town in the West. The movement is led by mayor and 35-year resident Dave Sakrison, 61, who was elected…

Alan Dershowitz, meet Steven Donziger. On behalf of 30,000 inhabitants of Ecuador's remote Oriente region, this New York lawyer is putting it to Big Oil. But will his multi-billion-dollar lawsuit establish a global precedent—or is he just looking for a scapegoat for one of the nastiest messes on earth?

Our reconnaissance of French Polynesia turns up the South Pacific's freshest adventures

The old Seven Wonders are history

Welcome to the tropical Philippine island of Jolo, where life is like a Corona ad—coconut trees, white-sand beaches, bathtub-warm seas. Except those guys in the water are U.S. Green Berets, and those kids on dirt bikes are jihadists known for kidnapping Western tourists. Even stranger? On this front, at least, America seems to be winning.

Listen to an interview with John Falk, author of February’s “This is the War on Terror. Wish You Were Here!” and see Antonin Kratochvil's photo outtakes from the story here.

Get ready for the new age of adventure on the world's wildest continent. Whether it's the Ugandan National Kayak Team leading raft trips on the raging White Nile or entrepreneurial young guides building stylish bush camps with an eye toward helping local communities, a fresh generation is redefining travel in…

Four years ago, the president of Gabon announced the creation of an unprecedented 13 new national parks. Ready for a visit? On a grueling first descent down the Djidji River, ROB BUCHANAN checks in on the world's most ambitious conservation plan and discovers a pristine wilderness unmatched in its magic—and a country not quite ready fo

Forget après ski. Three January film festivals are redefining post-powder entertainment. Head to Park City, Utah, or Nevada City, California, for the winter’s coolest mountain town film festivals, where you can play outside by day and catch top film premieres by night.

When freeskier Kit DesLauriers dropped in at 29,035 feet on Mount Everest in October, she became the first person to ski off the Seven Summits. Kit, her husband, Rob, and photographer Jimmy Chin also became the first Americans to ski from the top of the world's tallest mountain.

Big names, big adventure—and a message for the masses

The year's best voices on the hottest spots around

That's what many Africans are calling Thomas Cholmondeley, the scion of Kenya's most famous white family who killed two black men on his vast Rift Valley ranch in the space of a year. But was it stone-cold murder or self-defense? Against a backdrop of rising racial tensions and brutal violence, JOSHUA HAMMER reports on the trial that could shatter the

November 15, 2006 In Outside‘s December issue, Joshua Hammer reports on the murder trial of Kenyan aristocrat Thomas Cholmondeley (“The Kenyan Cowboy,” page 158), who has been accused of killing Robert Njoya, a black poacher found trespassing on his 50,000-acre Soysambu Ranch in Kenya’s Great Rift Valley on May…

Untold riches may lie hidden in Arizona.

A fateful trek into nature's tangled labyrinth

A California forest ranger meets his fate in the forest.

The Bermuda Triangle isn't the only place you might witness the unexplained.

Who can resist a good mystery, the kind that leaves you both rattled and baffled? Certainly not us. So it's with sinister pleasure that we bring you 13 tales of unrighteous deeds, inexplicable vanishings, supernatural weirdness, and the stuff that nightmares are made of.

An unholy terror descends on South Asia.

When he landed a rare permit to hunt bison deep in the Alaskan wilderness, our fearless forager thought he'd be living out a childhood dream. Wild buffalo, hungry grizzlies, nearly fatal hypothermia—what more could a grown man ask for?

There's only one best ski town for nighttime fun, and it's Aspen

When ultracyclist Bob Breedlove fatally collided with a pickup truck during the 2005 Race Across America, law-enforcement officials in Trinidad, Colorado, called it a tragic accident—and nothing more. But friends and family have been investigating his death ever since, and they're making some disturbing allegations. Can they prove their case, or are th

Rethinking the classic game expedition on a winged voyage over Namibia, where wildlife is only part of the landscape of vast deserts and empty coastlines

Prepare for sensory overload—regal palaces, wireless tech, urbanized elephants, Bollywood style, and more than a billion coexisting citizens—in the giant, baffling spectacle of modern India

There's a lot to love about the Arkansas Ozarks: fresh trout, sick singletrack, and the onset of rural chic

Unique, irreplaceable, and still largely unknown—our must-see-now list of the UN's latest World Heritage picks

In the mother of all canyons, a big-picture adventure below the rim

Red-hot lava, scary pelagics, and heavenly creatures all come out after dark on Hawaii's Big Island

Chasing tall legends for his new book, Blood and Thunder, Hampton Sides takes a wild ride deep into one of the most sacred spots on earth—Arizona's Canyon de Chelly

Decompress from summer in Spain's Pyrenean lodges

Scientists proclaim Indonesia's Bird's Head Seascape the most biodiverse marine area in the world.

From Pablo Escobar's abandoned villa to the sun-bleached sands of the Riviera Maya, an assignment doesn't get much better than this.

Getting There: Canyon de Chelly is located in Chinle, Arizona, a four drive from Albuquerque or six hours from Phoenix. Canyon de Chelly National Monument is open year-round, though the winters are cold and tours run less often. Where to Stay: Campsites within the monument are free and…

Outside editor at large Hampton Sides has a gift for homing in on some of the most intense and violent moments in history. Winner of the 2002 PEN USA Award for non-fiction, he wrote about Bataan Death March survivors in his first book, the bestselling Ghost Soldiers (adapted into the…

Who says you need fossil fuels? Four adventurers—including Laird Hamilton, who paddled the English Channel—circle the globe under their own steam.

A tourism industry hobbled by years of civil war and political instability looks to rebound as Nepal makes moves toward a lasting peace. Is it finally safe to go back?

Ten go-now getaways that are short on hassle but long on adventure—no passport required

Prepare to be converted by this tiny Central American nation of raw, dark jungle, teeming reefs, and a very original cast of locals. (They all speak English!)

David Sharp's lonely death on Mount Everest revived the old, raging debates about personal ethics and the wisdom of commercially guided climbing. But whatever went right and wrong in 2006, the bottom line remains: You challenge this peak at your own risk, because its punishments are swift, terrible, and blind.

You need to learn your lesson! So listen up to Mike Roberto, a fast-talking consultant who uses the '96 saga as a teaching tool for students, lawyers, and businessmen.

Sending Jon Krakauer to Everest was my idea. After the news broke, I spent the better part of a day wondering if I'd put him in a frozen grave.

Client, Mountain Madness

Survivors from Everest '96 recall a day of terror and confusion that many still believe was distorted in ways that oversimplified complex events and dishonored the dead.

With 25 national parks, 815 miles of coastline, and thousands of wildlife species, Costa Rica is indeed a rich coast. Experience it all with these seven sea-to-jungle family adventures.

We sit down for a candid conversation with Outside contributor Eric Hansen about his most recent assignment, a quest to find the world's most extreme bar, Colombia's El Mirador, for the September feature story, "It's Thriller Time."

Wanna live where the action is? The goal: Trails out the back door, a serious Saturday-morning peloton, whitewater just up the road, and neighbors eager to join in. Our source: The best adventure athletes in America, who tell us where they live and why. The result: 20 places where locals work, train, and play hard. Start packing now.

Think life in America's favorite outdoor mecca would be dreamy? Careful what you wish for.

Is it possible to guide safely on Everest? Or will the mountain always demand its pound of flesh? MARK JENKINS talks to a dream team of veterans—between them, they've reached the summit 17 times—in a frank look at the risks, rewards, and nightmares of taking clients to the top.

North Korea opens its doors to American tourists