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Over the past decade, research into compression sportswear has exploded. Here’s what the results reveal.

It’s time to break out the merino base layers and the heat-exchange breathing masks

A selection of (mostly) new titles for fans of science, endurance, fitness, and adventure

The genes that make some people vulnerable to a fatal heart stoppage may be the same ones that give them an athletic edge, researchers suggest

Sports medicine physicians are rethinking the relationship between damage to your body and how it feels

As skimo prepares for its Olympic debut in 2026, sports scientists explore the sport’s demands

Your GPS watch and other gadgets are great at describing training, but prescribing it is a harder challenge

A mathematical model explains how endurance and speed come together to determine who will win a last-lap sprint

A new study quantifies the effects of running on technical terrain

A new study uses machine learning to quantify the effects of temperature, humidity, heat, and sun

Scientists take their equations for the energy demand of hills and rough terrain out into the real world

The link between serious cycling and poor bone health is well established, but researchers are still debating what to do about it

The physiological differences between men and women affect how much fluid they store, how they sweat, and how quickly they heat up. Does that matter?

Yes, people sometimes die while running. No, that doesn’t mean running is “dangerous.”

A new study investigates how different types of physical performance are affected by the time of day

The case of 24-year-old Daniel Granberg, who died of high-altitude pulmonary edema earlier this month, highlights the danger of altitudes well below the Himalayan “death zone”

A new study suggests that hydrogels enable you to down more carbs with less digestive distress, and race faster as a result.

A new app called NatureQuant harnesses the latest research to track and rate your time outside. Next up: determining how much you need.

A new study measures the physical and cognitive load of four different treading techniques. The key? Generate lift.

Regular exercisers drink more, a new study confirms, but are less likely to be problem drinkers

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