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On snow as in life, it’s important not to look like a bozo, and for new skiers, handling long, clunky boards is the original challenge. Ignore the hecklers—there’s more than one way to do it right. 

The grandeur of the Great Salt Lake stopped Brigham Young in his tracks and inspired John Muir to jump in for a swim. Yet now it’s in danger of disappearing, sucked dry by agriculture, climate change, and suburban lawns. Many Utahns would just as soon pave it, but as Bill Gifford learned during a yearlong exploration, there’s beauty and natural splendor here that deserves to live on.

Hardcore cyclists are repulsed when a guy rides naked from the waist up. Why? During a long, sweltering summer, our writer defied the haters, risking all to bring blissful freedom to his sweaty torso.

In his long-awaited memoir, 'One-Way Ticket,' a cheater turned reformer tells all about performance-enhancing drugs, the Tour de France, and a rider he used to know named Lance

It sure looks like it. Bill Gifford on the $100 million legal battle that ended with a whimper.

How a rug turned a pensive undergrad poet into a writer

Clever, goofy, charismatic, and fast, the two-time world champion may never win the Tour de France (he’s not a climber), but he just might be the star who saves bike racing

South African physician Tim Noakes, one of the world’s greatest sports scientists, has been preaching an ultra-low-carb, high-fat diet as the key to fitness and health. His ideas have made him a bestselling guru, but now his critics are pushing back—and as Bill Gifford reports, they’re putting his theories on trial.

Some of the world’s scariest waves explode off the coast of Portugal, and North Shore gunslinger Garrett McNamara won’t stop until he’s tamed an elusive wave he calls Big Mama

An embedded film-maker boldly documents Lance Armstrong’s downfall

Body fat is just an inert layer of blubber, right? If only. New research shows that it's more like a toxic parasite that doesn't want to let go. The good news: if you exercise and eat right, you can force it to.

Closing the book (we hope) on bike racing’s drug-fueled era of excess

With the release of his new tell-all about the doping culture of professional cycling, The Secret Race, Tyler Hamilton has been blamed for cashing in on the celebrity of one-time teammate and brother-like figure Lance Armstrong. But what he's really saying—to Armstrong and everyone else—is this: Come clean with me. You'll feel better, and it's not too la

Tyler Hamilton’s new book, The Secret Race, makes it impossible to believe Lance’s story anymore

If Lance Armstrong went to jail and Livestrong went away, that would be a huge setback in our war against cancer, right? Not exactly, because the ­famous nonprofit donates almost ­nothing to scientific research. BILL GIFFORD looks at where the money goes and finds a mix of fine ideas, millions of dollars aimed at “awareness,” and a few very blurry lines.

Two decades after Greg LeMond became the first American to win the Tour de France, the world's biggest bike race is our party now. The only question: How long will we stay?

Meet the Champions Club, an elite group of bike-crazy execs who are richer than Croesus, can hammer with Lance, and are donating millions to ensure a gold-plated future for U.S. cycling

The Golden State gets set to host America's richest bike race ever

U.S. Postal redefined how a Tour de France team should be built. But with new riders, new sponsorship, and new demands within the sport, can Lance and his teammates live up to their pedigree and grab a seventh yellow jersey?

Aside from T-Mobile's Jan Ullrich and CSC's Ivan Basso, few of the riders on the 22 teams lining up for the Tour de France have a legitimate shot at winning the whole thing. But there is still the glory of stage wins and the races within the race—for the green sprinter's jersey and the polka-dot climber's jersey, among others. Whether shadowing Discovery o

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