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Vehicle rental sites like Outdoorsy and Turo are insanely popular, but like becoming a host on Airbnb, there is a lot you should consider before leaving your prized adventuremobile with people from the internet. One vanlord shares his wisdom.

The company is bringing its camping game to pop-tops—and we can't wait

The first mass-produced, off-road-ready camper to be sold in the U.S. in decades is a winner

If you're going to splurge on the vehicle of your dreams, best to kit it out properly

Four-wheeled fun for the car-camping masses

In 2009, Mike Sandone and his soon-to-be wife, Sofie, took an epic road trip across the mountains, beaches, and salt flats of Sonora, Mexico, in an old Jeep Wrangler. They wanted to be highly mobile, so most nights they slept in the cramped car. Sandone kept a checklist of…

Jay Nelson contracted the road-trip bug in the 1980s when his parents took him and his sisters on a romp across Europe in a VW Vanagon. Afterward they shipped the van back to California so they could keep rolling across the American West. “Those are some of my best childhood memories,” says Nelson.

Back in the eighties, vintage Land Cruisers were fetish objects to Tim McGrath and his buddies at Albuquerque’s Eldorado High School. During his junior year, McGrath was ecstatic to find a dark green 1974 FJ40 decaying in a barn. He scoured out the mud, mice nests, and chicken shit, then spent weekends testing the truck on camping excursions in the local mountains.

James Crowe didn’t start out a motorcycle guy. After a childhood filled with romping around the British Columbia backcountry on skis and mountain bikes, he became fascinated with combustion-powered vehicles and landed an apprenticeship at Steve’s Auto Restorations, a legendary shop in Portland, Oregon, in 2006.

On November 2, 2014, then 28-year-old Stephan Shay ran the toughest race of his life. Not only was the New York City Marathon freezing cold and rainy, but eight years earlier, Shay’s older brother Ryan died from a heart attack on the same course during an Olympic Trials race, also at the age of 28. Shay finished fourth among Americans and sixteenth overall.

For a certain breed of adventurous souls, the key to happiness is a road machine that forever stokes their desire to chase fun. Looking at these seven dream rigs, it's hard not to want to play along.

El Niño is bringing gigantic waves to the Pacific this winter, priming big-wave surfers for a season of epic—and dangerous—proportions

The e-camper features some innovative tech, but it lacks the soul of the Vanagon and the Microbus

We're still surfing in the USA.

With a world record on the line, determining the winner of the Billabong XXL "Biggest Wave" award turned into one of the toughest judgment calls in big wave surfing's history.

"I bought my first VW Westfalia Vanagon camper back in 1999, and have since owned five of them. I finally settled on a gorgeous 1991 model—lucked into via Craigslist for $9,000 a few years ago."

Questionable use of wearable cams is causing a surge in accidents

Getting around the laws that make overnight seaside camping frustratingly difficult

Why the intrepid Vanagon has once again earned its place as the ultimate outdoor vehicle

One of the greatest big-wave surfers alive nearly died on a 50-footer in December. Now many in the surfing world are blaming another heavyweight—and the jet-powered board he was riding.

South Carolina surfers and other Lowcountry residents can't stop talking about two white sharks that have been spotted just off the East Coast. But these 16-foot giants may have been swimming in our waters all along.

New rescue technology is emboldening surfers to take bigger risks than ever before. Which means epic rides—and wipeouts.

Four technologies that are changing surfing safety

When a YouTube video showing a "big-ass" shark snatching a tasty red drum off the end of a fishing pole went viral last week, Chris Dixon, who lives on the water in the area, wondered if he should be more concerned. He spoke to Arnold Postell, a senior biologist at the South Carolina Aquarium, to find out.

The judging panel at last week's Global Big Wave Awards determined that Garrett McNamara's much-discussed wave in Portugal this past November was 78 feet, or one foot taller than Mike Parsons' record-holding monster. But the measurements of both waves are so crude as to mean absolutely nothing.

In the wake of a controversial ESPN interview, big wave surfers tell Laird Hamilton to put up or shut up

On the afternoon of December 26, 2011, surf forecasting guru and media mogul Sean Collins died of a heart attack. What will the loss of the sport’s oracle mean for the surfing industry and for the sport?