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Introducing Outside+, a whole new way to feed your outdoor passions

Hard-won advice from someone who hated the sport, until it changed his life

In September 2017, Outside published a feature about the ‘Berserk,’ a ship that went missing in 2011 off the coast of Antarctica with three men aboard. The expedition leader, Jarle Andhoy, disagreed with the story we published, which contained some factual errors, and with our portrayal of the lost men of the ‘Berserk.’ He also believed that the story left out crucial information about the days before the ship’s disappearance. Outside editor in chief Christopher Keyes interviewed Andhoy and his lawyer, Gunnar Nerdrum Aagaard, to better understand new details the two have gathered, which may help explain what happened to the men on board.

How L. Renee Blount, a.k.a. Instagram's @urbanclimbr, blended her passions for climbing, travel, and design into a budding photography career

From going big on snacks to active pit stops, here's everything you need to know before taking a long road trip with the whole family

Can a lifelong tent pitcher with a penchant for roughing it learn to appreciate high-thread-count sheets and teak-floored showers in the midst of nature? Our editor agreed to suffer in the name of research to find out.

Whether we needed another documentary about the disgraced cyclist is up for debate, but 'Lance' is an entertaining look at the saga—and wait until you hear what he says about Floyd Landis

In 2005, Richard Louv helped usher in the nature-as-therapy movement. His latest book asks us to start bonding with wild animals.

The writer and climate activist talks about his new book 'Falter' and how the human race got itself into such a big mess

A month on mPEAK, a performance-driven mindfulness program

Ben Greenfield has some extreme ideas for living healthy. The thing is, most of them work.

For outdoor brands and journalists, it’s been far too easy to return to familiar places to find writers, stories, and images. This month’s issue is a concerted effort to chart a new path.

Over the last 41 years, we’ve published some astonishing stories of misadventure. This new collection represents the wildest tales we’ve ever told.

Plus two more books we're reading this month

What you’ll take from the stories in this issue is that same bit of wisdom gleaned from all great adventure tales. We humans can endure far more than we ever imagined.

To commemorate our 40th anniversary, we've packaged more than 140 of the best adventure photos we've ever featured

We tried to have a serious conversation with the SNL alum about his new HBO cycling mockumentary, Tour de Pharmacy. It sort of worked.

What used to be a trickle of seemingly minor policy stories has become a weekly firehose of significant developments, all of which we're committed to covering in a clear-eyed, authoritative way

Ski endless untouched powder from an artful lodge on the island’s remote upper coast

During her four-year tenure as Secretary of the Interior, Sally Jewell, a former oil-industry engineer and CEO of REI, has helped designate 18 new national monuments, increase youth engagement in the national parks, and limit access for energy exploration. As a Trump administration with very different views on conservation prepares to take the reins in Washington, Christopher Keyes sat down with the secretary to discuss her legacy—and the uncertain future of America’s public lands.

A morning run or evening spin class may feel great, but if the rest of your day involves sitting on your ass, a brief burst does little for your overall well-being.

And how it's going to change the way you see all of your stuff

It doesn't take much to feel like you've gotten away.

Two adventure masterpieces revisit epic failures of ambition

The most hated man in bike racing wants a second chance with the public. Here's why that's not a sign of the apocalypse.

Our April 2013 magazine makes a foray into the bizarre but edible—from insects to IPAs. But it's not all about the shock factor.

Hal Koerner has a formula for fitness and life that keeps him winning and smiling. So follow his lead—just don’t try to keep up.

What do you get when you combine six eye surgeons, thirteen runners, six educators, two nonprofits, 871 cataract patients, 63,000 students, two of the fastest men on the planet, and one trail race in the remote highlands of East Africa? Accelerate Ethiopia. Welcome to the brave new world of adventure philanthropy.

The news leaks about The Secret Race have vastly undersold its importance. Tyler Hamilton’s book is a historic, definitive indictment of cycling’s culture of doping during the Armstrong era.

A fundraising trip in Tigray, Ethiopia, next February gives 14 runners the chance to train with some of the world’s greatest runners—and help restore sight to more than 1,000 locals

Christopher Keyes talks with Robert Koester, the renowned search-and-rescue specialist, about looking for autistic children and being involved in the hunt for Robert Wood Jr.

The case against the case against the case against Lance Armstrong

Outside talks to the man who kick-started the minimalist revolution

After every workout, recovery starts with the first thing you put in your mouth

And if the South African track sensation makes it to the start line for the 2012 Olympic Games in London, we may never look at disabilities—or competitive sports—the same way again.

No excuses. It's time to ditch that gas-guzzler for an electric car.

A documentary about electric cars, a cool climbing app, and the best long-form journalism websites

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