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The Swiss Alps are home to an incredible new hut-to-hut runners’ route called the Via Valais. It’s a little demanding—150 miles, nine stages, and 42,000 feet of elevation gain—but if you can take it on, you’re guaranteed one of the most spectacular adventures of your life.

When you’re covering 145 miles through the Alps, every gram counts

The defendants are accused of committing 29 burglaries of bicycle shops over seven months, sometimes using rocks, sledgehammers, and stolen U-Hauls for their smash-and-grab heists

“You always think you’ll save the ones you love when the moment comes. But he didn’t save her.”

A study from the Colorado Avalanche Information Center indicated something counterintuitive: experience doesn't always correspond with safety

The craft beer revolution turned the tall cousin of cannabis into a breakout ingredient, infusing your brew with flavors and aromas that range from stone fruit to barrel oak. Christopher Solomon hits the road to understand why hop madness isn’t over yet—and why brewers and plant breeders are always on the prowl for the next big thing.

Ryan Gellert, who has overseen the brand's business across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa since 2014, will run the company

The pandemic shutdown devastated the world’s manufacturing center—and many of the companies that rely on it. And there were already plenty of reasons to get out.

From iconic brands like Patagonia to that indispensable camping store in your hometown, the adventure economy has taken an unprecedented hit. The good news: the people who created these businesses are doers, and they're putting everything they've got into staying afloat and preparing for an uncertain future.

As wilderness hubs like Bishop and Moab shutter their gates to visitors, what's an outdoor lover to do during a pandemic? We're here to help.

Skiers and others venturing into the backcountry often end up too far apart to help each other when an avalanche strikes

In a controversial move, the secretary of the interior recently decreed that motorized bikes should be allowed anywhere that standard bikes are permitted. How this will work is still being sorted out, but the world of pedal-assist riding is about to really open up.

A lifelong runner and outdoor athlete is hit with a mysterious physical breakdown. Once the engine starts to fail, what happens to the mind?

How creating a "simplified permit system" could decrease the public's input in the land of many uses

Chris Solomon has been all over the world and knows what you really need when you're abroad

The Alaska senator sent us a letter about her enviro bonafides. Naturally, we checked her work.

Can recent events be chalked up to the occasional confusion of bureaucracy? Or is something more worrisome afoot?

Even as Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke has said he wants to give states more decision-making power over federal lands, the Trump administration has taken numerous steps to limit public input

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke will offer up nearly 4 million acres of public lands for lease this year, much of it for dirt cheap

Republicans from Ulysses S. Grant to George H.W. Bush have passed some of our most powerful environmental laws. Why did the party reverse course?

Classroom time isn't so bad when you're building fly-fishing rods in Virginia or barbecuing in the Lone Star State

In Washington State, a group of researchers is mining social media posts and photos to identify overused trails and turn your next weekend adventure into a real escape

As Wyoming prepares for the first grizzly hunt in the lower 48 in decades, at least two protesters won tags they say they won't use. Will their strategy work?

Spitfire excels at the curious sport of dock diving, or, in other words, jumping really, really far. That skill has landed him and his owner, 13-year-old Sydney Mackey, five world records—and counting.

A new study recommends that humans need to give animals time as well as space

As a reporter, I’ve been taught to keep my opinions to myself. But I’ve also visited Alaska's McNeil River—the world's greatest brown-bear sanctuary—and to hold my tongue about its possible destruction would make me complicit in the death of something truly remarkable and wild.

Some see economic windfall. Others, a carbon bomb.

The International Rescue Committee hopes that by teaching kids how to conquer the crag, they'll also be better off facing challenges in their daily lives

Researchers studied 1,500 Rocky Mountain forests that had been burned by wildfires. They found that most of the woods aren't recovering after the blaze—and in some cases, they're not returning at all. The culprit? A warming planet.

Recent studies have arrived at the same blunt conclusion: the world’s last, big wildlands are disappearing at an alarming rate. Is there anything to be done?

When extreme skier Adam Roberts was killed by an avalanche in the mountains of Washington State, some people wondered if he’d died on purpose. Christopher Solomon reconstructs a life in which athletic talent, fearlessness, and mental illness combined to create an unbearable reality.

On March 21, the Department of Interior will hold the largest auction of offshore leases in U.S. history, including all unleased areas on the Gulf of Mexico’s outer continental shelf. But do energy extractors actually want such land and waters?

A new report suggests that the answer is no, which could impact hunted species across the U.S. and Canada

Would you a take a year of your life to get outside, work hard on public lands, and learn some skills, for a minimal stipend? Some members of Congress—from both parties—are betting you might.

A semi-detailed list of everything we know (and we still have plenty of questions) about possible public land closures starting tomorrow if the lights go out for the feds

In the last 18 months, long-simmering disputes have boiled over amid claims of trespassing, political meddling, government bullying, and retaliation. Some worry that what’s happening there may harbinger what’s to come on public land across the nation. It’s enough to call the situation, well, you know.

Congress got closer to drilling in the "crown jewel" Arctic refuge with legislation that just cleared the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources

On Friday, the President told Senator Orrin Hatch that he planned to downsize two Utah national monuments. Here's why nothing's likely to happen soon.

A leaked five-year strategic plan has zero mention of “climate change” or “diversity,” marking a major pivot away from its predecessor

The 27-year-old Kennedy died by suicide after Perkins, his girlfriend, was killed in an avalanche in Bozeman, Montana

Despite overwhelming public support for preserving public lands, the Secretary of the Interior is still recommending Trump trim "a handful" of national monuments. He just won't publicly say which ones—or by how much.

The Ptarmigan Traverse in Washington State’s North Cascades has had the word “classic” pinned to it nearly from the time it was pioneered in 1938. You don’t get much more high-n-wild in the Lower 48 than on this 35-mile-plus mountaineering trip, which starts in North Cascades National Park and immediately dives south into the Glacier Peak Wilderness.

The people have spoken. In a study released Tuesday, over 99 percent of people said they support the 27 monuments up for review. President Donald Trump, are you listening?

Mountain bikes were made for this: 450 miles of empty, achingly scenic backcountry in southern Utah, on little-known trails pieced together in the spirit of Edward Abbey. Our writer saddles up to get lost.

Congressman Rob Bishop of Utah wants to transfer federal land to the states, gut the Endangered Species Act, and eliminate the Antiquities Act—and D.C. is starting to listen

After a 45-day review period, the Secretary of the Interior advised President Trump to redraw the boundary of the controversial national monument—a decision that will almost definitely be tested in court

If the budget is a political document that reflects a president’s priorities, Trump’s priorities are clear—and the environment, wildlife, and the Great Outdoors don’t rank particularly high

The Department of the Interior is soliciting public input on the 27 monuments Trump ordered to review. Now’s your chance to speak up about what happens to them.

A new bill would open up wilderness areas to bikes—but the arguments in favor of it don't hold water

Social media can expose tens of thousands of people to places in an instant. That's a double-edged sword.

With little fanfare, one of the tallest, largest ski resorts in the world is taking shape in British Columbia, masterminded by the most visionary resort architect you've never heard of

When a creature mysteriously turns up dead in Alaska—be it a sea otter, polar bear, or humpback whale—veterinary pathologist Kathy Burek gets the call. Her necropsies reveal cause of death and causes for concern as climate change frees up new pathogens and other dangers in a vast, thawing north.

Trump's order to review the national-monument designations of the past 21 years seems to be the first concrete intimation of rolling back the protections all together

Throughout winter, regional avalanche forecasters rank the danger level in the backcountry, but a new study found they can sometimes disagree dramatically on snowpack conditions

It’s too early to know for certain what a Donald Trump presidency means for the environment and public-lands policy. But we have some ideas.

A new bill before Congress aims to protect the Wasatch mountains from further development while accommodating different uses

Utah-based Mountain Hub is out to crowdsource backcountry safety

What does the GOP's big orange machine think about issues like climate change, energy development, and federal control of public lands? We rounded up Trump's surprising (and sometimes shocking) set of views.

Veteran river guide Joshua “Frenchy” Tourjee was helping lead an OARS trip when he went missing more than a week ago near Pancho’s Kitchen

The biggest craze in cycling combines the popularity of distance hiking, gravel grinding, and vanlife. But for bikepacking disciples like Tom and Sarah Swallow, simplicity and solitude are the real rewards.

Bike Batman was just an average-seeming guy in Seattle who liked to ride his bicycles. He had no inkling to become a vigilante who would face off against criminals while armed with little more than a smartphone, some spare time, and a pair of brass balls. But sometimes in life, the cape finds you.

The greatest thing about the Pacific Northwest is how much accessible adventure hides in the creases of its maps.

The public trust doctrine is increasingly invoked by environmental groups seeking sweeping, long-term solutions to problems like global warming, ocean acidification, and destructive resource extraction

10 easy trips, maximum fun guaranteed

Even Sierra Club-approved activities can have disastrous effects on the natural places we revere. And that's led to a fracture between two should-be allies: recreationists and conservationists.

Utah congressman Rob Bishop, a conservative Republican who has long opposed federal management of western lands, has emerged as the unlikely architect of a grand compromise, one that would involve massive horse trading to preserve millions of acres of wilderness while opening millions more to resource extraction. Is this a trick, or the best way to solve ancient disputes that too often go nowhere?

Breaking down the latest research and what it means for every kind of runner

Different parts of our body seem to talk to and influence each other, even when they are far apart and—one might think—unconnected

Can a private company trademark public property? That's the question the feds are scrambling to answer after a longtime concessionaire in Yosemite claimed rights to the names of some of the park's most iconic locations.

A growing number of quick-fix supplements have a dirty secret, and it’s killing young, otherwise healthy people looking for an edge. So what is the FDA going to do about it?

The year ahead will be filled with goggles that guide us down the ski hill, stoves that could save humanity, and Kubrickian pods that will carry us to the edge of space

The world's leading design center for outdoor footwear—everything from featherweight climbing shoes to hard-shelled mountaineering stompers—is a small city in northern Italy where craftsmanship reigns.

Keep grinding out miles and see the world

It doesn't get easier, you just go faster

From eternal youth (kind of) to GPS genitalia, a whole world of perks awaits

They get paid to climb mountains and raft whitewater. But guiding isn't all a dream—not with whiny clients, lousy tips, and the occasional colleague pranking you in a gorilla suit.

Fact-checking trusted training maxims

Lightweight, durable, and comfy, this gear finds its way into Chris Solomon's pack every time he heads out the front door.

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