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"I fell in love with cycling while watching the Tour each year with my father. When he was dying last summer, it became so much more than just the world's biggest bike race."

As our writer cheered on his three-year-old at the Strider Cup in Texas—a merciless race replete with tears, anxiety, and elation—he had one question: Is intense competition good for the tiniest of competitors?

Like it or not—(not)—suspicion still clouds pro bike racing. Is there a way racers can prove they're clean? One wild plan to quell the critics.

These sports aren't necessarily deadly, but they certainly instill an imminent sense of death—which is what makes them so thrilling and why we can't look away.

Do doping scandals dampen TV turnout for the Tour, and should you watch this year’s race in light of Armstrong’s recent downfall? Ian Dille says, not really and, yes.

And U.S. fans have made the sport’s culture of booze, brats, and revelry all their own

Increasingly, race organizers are testing non-elite athletes for performance-enhancing drugs. But is it fair, or even possible, to hold amateurs to the same stringent standards as the pros?