Published

As the world continues to grapple with COVID-19, travel for many is still a faraway dream. But Ian Frazier reminds us that there’s no more promising feeling than hitting the road, windows down, hair blowing, full speed ahead.

There are many noble qualities about living simple. But if you want to impress someone, for God's sake, don't tell them you live in your van.

At the planet's biggest ice-fishing tournament, held every January in Brainerd, Minnesota, 10,000 contestants battle 20-below temperatures for a $150,000 purse. Ian Frazier slips and slides among wily fish, cheese curds, and some of the greatest nearly frozen anglers he's ever seen.

Because the map application on your phone cannot give you the big picture

In South Florida, cane toads are so numerous that they seem to be dropping from the sky. They're overtaking parking lots and backyards, can weigh almost six pounds, and pack enough poison to kill pets. Why the surge?

John Muir rhapsodizing about Yosemite is one thing, but Ian Frazier has had it with people calling their favorite outdoor spots “cathedrals,” “shrines,” and “sacred spaces.” The false piety detracts from the real task at hand: seeing these places as they actually are.

The marine biologist has done things in the ocean that would scare most people senseless. She's been alone in total darkness thousands of feet down, hovered under a Russian ship as it pinged her submarine, and been charged by huge sharks. But one thing does frighten her: the dire state of our overfished and polluted seas, something she spends every waking hour trying to change.

What man's best friend can teach us about being content

Proven strategies for getting laughs, plus some always winning punch lines

A few words on kick-starting a love of adventure

The Deschutes River fly-fishing guide called Stealhead Joe was an angling master with a long list of devoted clients. But as Ian Frazier, who fished with Joe last fall, learned, off the water, Joe’s life was a tangle of troubles that ultimately overwhelmed him.

Whatever happened to an outdoorsman’s sacred right to exaggerate? In the age of digitized adventure, the fish that got away is gone forever.

Outside's best writers share their thoughts on fatherhood and nature-bonding with Dad.

A new film chronicles the classic story of a daring prison break from a Soviet gulag. We dispatched our crankiest critic to weigh in on the somewhat true story.

Pay attention, young adventurers—school's in session

Can't skip town this weekend? No problem

To catch a caveman like Osama bin Laden, who's at home in some of the earth's most remote mountains, what you really need is a great outdoorsman.

In the unlikeliest of places, in the waters off JFK airport in New York, IAN FRAZIER lands a few big fish with Captain Frank, a guide who matches his passion striper for striper and knows why fishing is connected to everything

When we travel, we think we don’t want to get sick, but maybe, less consciously, we’re not so sure. If nothing of note happens on a journey, was it one?

Or does it loathe that enraptured human touch? An earthy tale of fungal romance, fully consummated.

And other lofty ideas that pop into one's head and refuse to leave

Sure, the wilderness is beautiful. But it can also frighten you out of your mind.

The scientists were clinging to the side of the ice they’d been standing on, 50 feet above the waterline. In a few seconds, the berg had gone over on top of them.

You know the type. They're Martha Stewart's worst nightmare. They're (usually) men of a certain age and outdoor inclination who track in mud, dump wet gear on the carpet, and clean God-knows-what in the kitchen sink. Isn't it beautiful?

Sometimes you just have to escape into the night, where unpredictable rendezvous and things that bite await you

We liberate the sport of fly-fishing and take you back to the clean and simple basics. Now go fish.

Let us now celebrate one of our most bountiful outdoor resources: bad advice. And if you listen carefully and act right away, it's absolutely free!