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You're addicted to your phone. You're loaded down by useless stuff. And you eat like a teenager. No wonder you can't find the time to play outside, see the world, and get in shape. Fortunately, streamlining your life—and having more fun—is easy: just do less. Here's how.

The national park's namesake tree may be designated endangered

It’s time to move beyond the divide between conservation and recreation

A new generation of classic national parks posters are frame-worthy

Three standout series capture the national parks

It’s not all fun and games in the parks

The only in-park brewery offers an unadulterated (and alcoholic) taste of our public treasures

Protesters have made genetically modified food a bogeyman, but it may be the key to feeding a growing planet

Ending dependence on fossil fuels will require the movement to get better at one thing: compromise

Brew your morning joe the right way: manually.

On November 25, when most retailers were pushing their flashiest Black Friday deals, Patagonia took out a full-page ad in The New York Times urging people not to buy one of its most popular jackets. Reactions ranged from adulation to contempt. Was this a hypocritical marketing ploy or an honest call to reduce consumption?

Slovenian superswimmer Martin Strel wants to tackle the Colorado.

They climbed the biggest walls, descended the longest rivers, and sailed the highest seas. And they went farther and faster under their own power than anyone else in 2010. Chosen for their ambition, their attitude, and their audacious lines, these are Outside's inaugural adventurers of the year.

Your urgent inquiries about natural disasters answered.

Because the heat of summer is upon us, we scoured the globe for the greatest sailing, fishing, paddling, diving, floating, surfing—you get the idea—trips out there. And since you can't always pop over to Indonesia, we picked a few close-to-home adventures, too.

Last year, 20-year-old climber Daniel Woods finished a disappointing second at the Teva Mountain Games' IFSC Bouldering World Cup. But after a four-month climbing tour in Europe and then solving the first V16 bouldering problem on U.S. soil, the Boulder, Colorado–based prodigy is the favorite at this June's World Cup, in Vail, which no American male has ever wo

Want to take an exotic trip and engage in some do-gooding, too? Check out Roadmonkey Adventure Philanthropy’s next adventure tour, which combines climbing Kilimanjaro with building a fishpond at a local Tanzanian school (June 12 26, $4,395; roadmonkey.net). And if you can’t make that journey, don’t despair.