Published

Vaccines are rolling out with increasing speed, but we’ll also need effective treatments, because new coronavirus cases will be a worldwide reality for years to come. Enter Jacob Glanville, a maverick San Francisco immunologist who believes he’s found an unparalleled path to healing.

With a résumé full of wins at kayaking's most prestigious competitions and historic first descents of the planet's deadliest whitewater, Nouria Newman is considered one of the greatest paddlers around. So why can't she turn her passion into a sustainable career?

Because remote, untracked snow is worth the effort

Since 2000, Tim Friede, a truck mechanic from Wisconsin, has endured some 200 snakebites and 700 injections of lethal snake venom—all part of a masochistic quest to immunize his body and offer his blood to scientists seeking a universal antivenom. For nearly two decades, few took him seriously. Then a gifted young immunologist stumbled upon Friede on YouTube—and became convinced that he was the key to conquering snakebites forever.

Inside the most destructive fire in American history—and why the West's cities and towns will keep on burning

One of the worst tragedies in the history of firefighting prompted little change to a culture that regularly puts young lives at risk. A few seasoned veterans are working to fix that.

Because boot-packing takes too long

Fire has always been a part of the landscape. The mistake we made was trying to stop it—something Florida never did.

When Kyle Dickman set out on a month-long road trip with his wife and infant son last spring, he was fueled by a carefree sense of adventure that had defined his entire life. Then he got bit by a venomous snake in a remote area of Yosemite National Park, and the harrowing event changed everything.

New Mexico's Bandelier National Monument holds clues to what may happen to forests affected by massive fires

Breaking down the numbers behind the catastrophic California fires

It's destructive, beautiful, and critical for our ecosystem

Trump's executive orders don't have environmental lawyers particularly worried—but that could change depending on how the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals rules on a handful of cases

As the Category Four storm threatened landfall last week, dozens of Urban Search and Rescue teams were deploying from around the country, mobilizing at lightning speed to save residents from the wreckage. Our man embedded with one of these elite squads—and soon learned the logistical nightmare involved with disaster aid on a massive scale.

You don’t need no stinkin’ chairlifts

Team Rubicon began in 2010 with a unique dual mission: providing disaster relief and giving struggling American veterans a vital sense of purpose. The program has a reputation for ignoring best practices and obliterating red tape, and it has already disrupted the aid industry. Now founder Jake Wood wants to take on the Red Cross.

Easier climbing equals more downhill

Teva sandal: A water shoe that came to define a generation of river athletes.

Tough-ass pants: A term for rugged work trousers that are particularly good at handling abuse.

Utility bike: A bicycle built for hauling children, gear, or grocery bags full of organic quinoa and local honey.

Snowboarding: A snowsports alternative to skiing.

Spork: An eating utensil that adds fork tines to a spoon and never fails to amuse its users.

SUP: Short for stand-up paddle-board, a stable floating platform that combines the cool of surfing with the practicality of a spin workout.

Tech binding: A lightweight binding system that transformed backcountry skiing and put telemarking on the path to obsolescence.

Suunto Vector: The original smartwatch.

A bindingless monoski invented in 1965.

A packable device producing fire for camp cooking.

A pioneering social-fitness app released in 2009.

Therm-a-Rest: The first mass-market inflatable sleeping pad.

Thule: A company founded by Swedish outdoorsman Erik Thulin, originally to make fishing gear.

Double Vacuum: A technology dating back to 1892 that suspends one container inside another, leaving a small amount of air between the two to insulate the inner contents from external temperature changes.

Caves, tepees, wall tents, those green canvas triangles that caused hypothermia in so many Boy Scouts—in one form or another, ideas borrowed from these flawed shelters appear in their modern descendents.

Vasque Sundowner: A svelte hiking boot that serves as a testament to how well-made products can endure despite evolving design trends.

Velcro: A two-piece fastening material that features hooks on one side and a swath of loops on the other.

Vibram: A vulcanized-rubber sole that revolutionized footwear.

Doug Tompkins: Businessman and crusading conservationist who cofounded the North Face and Esprit.

Tenth Mountain Division: An Army outfit specializing in mountain warfare, devised during World War II around the idea that it was easier to make troops out of skiers than skiers out of troops.

A former firefighter himself, former 'Outside' editor Kyle Dickman retells the story of the tragic 2013 Yarnell Hill Fire in Arizona in his new book.

Wildfire season is getting longer, scarier, and more dangerous. Here's what you need to know and how to prepare.

Clip sparks debate over response time

Officials have released a detail analysis of the deadly fire that killed 19 elite hotshots. Although much has been previously reported, the document offers a few revelations. Here’s what you need to know.

See the archive