Published

Two bold men, one reckless plan: to watch the sun go dark atop a huge snow-covered peak in South America. You won't believe what happened next.

The deadly 2019 climbing season prompted a worldwide demand to reform management of the world's highest peak. Is change really possible? Mark Jenkins, a veteran alpinist who reached the summit in 2012, lays down an emphatic yes.

During 40 years of adventure, hard-charging writer and climber Mark Jenkins has asked a lot of his wife and kids. After his fourth attempt on a dicey Chinese peak, he examines the risks and rewards of a risk-defying career.

A professional adventurer has to break a few eggs along the way—and, apparently, several bones and a skull. Mark Jenkins tallies up the most memorable injuries and mishaps from a life lived on the edge.

One thing you shouldn’t leave behind with your foolhardy youth: the great American dirtbag road trip. Mark Jenkins explains how to do it right.

As Mark Jenkins knows, wilderness first aid can hurt. (Just ask his patients.) So he finally did what everyone should do: he took a class from real experts.

Norway's forbidding Hardangervidda Plateau nearly killed Roald Amundsen when he attempted a ski traverse in the winter of 1896. But the failure set him on a path of training, study, and exploration that led to his historic conquest of the South Pole. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of that feat, Mark Jenkins and his brother Steve skied the route, an epic challenge that even now can prove deadly.

Outside sat down with Dos Equis spokesman Jonathan Goldsmith

Before the event, the doc gave me a six-day course of steroids for my back and threw in a bottle of Vicodin. “At your age,” he said, “after this race, you’re going to need it.”

In adventure and in life, Mike was my best friend—my stronger, wiser, wilder half. And in the end, when the last climb was over, that's all that really mattered.

The disappearance of two of North America's best alpinists left a grave question: What happens when the only way out is up?

Is it possible to guide safely on Everest? Or will the mountain always demand its pound of flesh? MARK JENKINS talks to a dream team of veterans—between them, they've reached the summit 17 times—in a frank look at the risks, rewards, and nightmares of taking clients to the top.

Why climb America's most spectacular—and controversial—natural landmark? For the same reason you shouldn't.

Get the most out of long summer days with featherweight performance gear for running, riding, climbing, and hiking

What happens when a Type A relaxation-phobe takes his first vacation in years? Life gets good again.

For a compulsive adventurer who can't stay put, sometimes there's only one cure: Get Zen. If only it were that easy.

Naysayers claim the age of adventure is over. On an unclimbed peak in Tibet, our man declares that it has just begun.

It's every adventurer's dilemma: Nothing's more exciting than the next trip—but nothing's harder than leaving home

For decades, no one had traversed the entire length of the Wakhan, following the old Silk Road from the northward bend of the Panj River. We had no idea if it could be done.

In the brave new world of Eastern Europe, a bond forged in adventure�then nearly forgotten�is reborn. Just in time.

It's time for a radical reform of high-altitude mountaineering�and a fresh debate over what it means to climb right

Modern adventure is safer than you think—once you know the difference between legitimate danger and irrational fear

On the trail of lost creatures, mythic rivers, and vanishing giants in Tasmania's wild—and final—frontier

For the relentlessly adventurous, learning the deeper lessons of injury starts with a tough rule: You break it, you own it.

Two guys, ten days, 500 miles by bike through gorgeous Norway. The only rule? No suffering.

A long-imagined journey to the spires of Africa marks the end of a dream—and the start of something new

How do you go native on an island made of ice? Scale glaciers, strip down, and steam it off.

Do you lie awake at night worrying that everything you know is wrong? You need what this guy is selling!

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry spent his life defying and outflying death. Then it caught up.

Is time traveler Tim Severin the greatest living explorer? Probably—but you'll never get him to admit it.

Pilot an ultralight and what do you get? A bird's-eye view of the world and a dose of the maverick spirit of flying.

Travel is one thing. But uprooting your family and moving abroad is a much deeper plunge into adventure.

A journey to the cradle of climbing reveals a strange new alpine environment, where glaciers are melting, mountains are falling, and nothing is as it was

Sometimes the toughest climb is out of your mind and into your own animal skin

Winding a thousand miles from India to China, the Burma Road was built to defend China in World War II, but the atomic bomb made it irrelevant and the jungle reclaimed it. Mark Jenkins vowed to do what no one had done for nearly 60 years—travel the entire Burma Road—and discovered the madness of present-day Myanmar.

What happens when a solitary day hike turns into the ultimate test of survival?

Australia's first great adventure was part Lewis and Clark, part Donner Party—searing proof that fame is a four-letter word

In 24-hour mountain-bike races, riders bond over singletrack and sleep deprivation. What's not to like?

In Bhutan's pristine alpine sanctuary, even a heathen climber can see the light

Canoeing the jungles of South America, where freedom is a family affair

The process is the point. But just try telling that to your younger, untutored, world-conquering self.

See the archive