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Most cyclists know that bike lanes offer very limited physical protection. They might not know that they offer approximately zero legal protection either.

Last February, 21-year-old Ronnie Ramon Huerta Jr. crashed his Ford 500 sedan into a pack of cyclists during the Palm Springs century. Here’s how the death of one rider, Mark Kristofferson, led to an exceptionally rare murder charge.

That fact was made painfully clear Sunday night when an autonomous Volvo XC90 hit and killed a woman who was walking her bike across the street in Tempe, Arizona

At least that's the result of a new study, which also found that drivers tend to cause crashes and close calls way more often than road bikers

Andy Samberg and Murray Miller's new mockumentary, complete with a strange supporting role for Lance, tests tortured fans' sense of humor

Let’s get this straight: if something horrible happens to me on a ride, don’t ever say I died doing what I love. I feel no affection about the idea of getting pulverized by a 4,000-pound SUV, especially if the driver was flipping through Instagram. Still, I recognize that something might happen. And rather than leave it up to other people to commemorate my life and death on the bike, I’ve decided to take matters into my own hands—with facts based on a terrifying encounter with a speeding Porsche that actually happened—just in case the next run-in turns out differently.

Then built it and then rode it around a Los Angeles suburb. Here are our first impressions.

After we heard the news of Tilford's death Wednesday, we spoke with 10 of the people who knew him best—friends, teammates, competitors—to paint a picture of a man who built his wonderful life around the joy of racing bikes

In 1967, Davis broke ground on the country's first true bike lane. Fifty years later, we look back on the inaugural system's impact—and how more work remains to be done to protect cyclists nationwide.

It starts with a deadly crash, like the one that happened in October on a busy Orange County street. Then the volunteers build the memorial. Peter Flax embedded with the team that makes ghost bikes in Southern California to record the process—and the tragedy that triggered it—from beginning to end.

Cyclists are badly hurt or killed in crashes with cars in every major North American city with regularity. Surely their lives mean more than maximizing the productivity of dump trucks.