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The hugely popular Netflix docuseries leaves out crucial facts about America's big-cat industry and the people trying to stop it

Some of the world's most passionate athletes are high pointers, climbers who will do anything to reach the tallest point in every state, county, or whatever other designation they can dream up. A lot of those peaks aren't so tall—like Delaware's 447.85-foot Ebright Azimuth—but there's plenty of challenge in this quest. Just ask John Mitchler, who had knocked off everything on his dream list except the tallest spot in a remote U.S. territory: Agrihan.

As rescuers worked to save seven climbers, television crews live-streamed everything. The question is: should they?

The actor-singer wants to be that guy who gets everyone outside

Making it through a catastrophic event is just the first step. Presenting five true case studies in survival.

Two people have died in pursuit of Forrest Fenn’s hidden treasure. New Mexico’s Chief of Police is pleading with him to call it off. But if you compare it to other outdoor activities, it's not any more dangerous.

On New Year's Day in 1985, Eastern Air Lines Flight 980 was carrying 29 passengers and a hell of a lot of contraband when it crashed into the side of a 21,112-foot mountain in Bolivia. For decades conspiracy theories abounded as the wreckage remained inaccessible, the bodies unrecovered, the black box missing. Then two friends from Boston organized an expedition that would blow the case wide open.

For a decade, the African nation of Burundi was home to a unique phenomenon: group jogs involving thousands of people who hit the streets to sing, socialize, and sometimes protest the nation’s authoritarian president, Pierre Nkurunziza. In March 2014, he banned the activity. As conflicts threaten to boil over—and the body count continues to rise—runners have become both weapons and victims.

Millionaire Forrest Fenn launched a thousand trips when he filled a chest with gold, rubies, and diamonds, and hid it somewhere north of Santa Fe. If one man is going to find it, by god, it's an ex-cop from Seattle named Darrell Seyler.