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These days I can break a record while finishing last. Some say they find me inspiring, but I often feel like a decrepit but willing old dog who gets a pat when he tries to chase his ball.

The alternative story of how, 40 years ago, running escaped from its amateur restrictions and became a modern, professional sport.

No runner has ever won the 5,000-meter, 1,500-meter, and 10,000-meter treble at the same Olympics. But there have been other memorable distance triples and doubles.

The first Olympic marathon was won by a runner with no coach, no training schedule, no gym, no special diet—only a lifetime of logging 16 miles a day delivering water.

A celebration of runners who didn't win but inspired us and won our admiration by living the Olympic ideal: “to have fought well.” 

The mile race is the perfect drama — to race, to watch, to relive — as these trackside accounts of unforgettable showdowns throughout running history reveal.

Secrets of long-term excellence as a runner, from Nick Willis, Deena Kastor, and others who might qualify for an Elite Longevity Hall of Fame.

A former elite competitor who keeps reviving his running — even at 81 with two artificial knees — provides guidelines for goals when returning from setbacks.

One personal view of 50 years of the race that did so much to create modern running — as a runner, broadcaster, fan, writer, and human.

What we learned about racing, racers, and the indomitable spirit of running from the London Marathon in the time of Covid-19.

Author Peter Lovesey dreams of being a great runner. His passion for running makes him a major crime novelist, and an important historian of the sport.

The story of a runner who went missing during the 1912 Olympic marathon and recorded the world's slowest time by several decades. He’s now celebrated as Japan’s ‘father of the marathon.’

Imagine Bill Rodgers, Mary Decker-Slaney, Wes Santee as Olympic champions; Kipchoge's double, Coe's treble, Nurmi's perfect ten.

A former elite provides 7 keys to successfully running hard when you're old, based on his experience of staging a comeback at 80.

What's it like to train and race with two knee replacements? Persistence and patience are the key.

Despite losing his goal of a world masters championship appearance this year, Roger Robinson is finding positives and keeps training and improving. 

A new book reveals many sides of Bill Squires, the legendary, whacky Boston coach who has mentored runners of all abilities and helped inspire the running boom.

As the visual archetype of the first mile of the New York City Marathon, the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge has created one of the iconic images of our age—and is one tough hill. 

Ron Hill, who ran every day for over 52 years and was a world-class champion, is a role model for each of us to be better runners and people.

The preview of Sunday's London Marathon men's race can be written in one word: Kipchoge.

Korir, the 2012 Boston Marathon Champion, is taking a break from politics to refocus on running and mentoring—and is back in Boston ready to race on Monday.

The Boston Marathon's course writes the script. Runners simply enact its strenuous narrative year after year. A brief history of tragedy and triumph.