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With fabrics created from alga, graphene, and copper, and hoodies built to last a hundred years, two British ad men are creating the apparel and gear of the future

In a small town in England in the early 1950s, a group of Brits gathered at a pub to form the world’s first off-road cycling club. They came from all classes—barons rubbed elbows with foundry workers—but were united by their love of the wild and a shared belief that a bike could get them anywhere they dreamed of. Seventy years on, Tom Vanderbilt heads to the UK to join a few current members in pursuit of the rough stuff.

Endos, yard sales, slams, whippers, and face-plants are all an important part of learning. It’s time we embraced the wipeout.

In her new book, ‘The Joy of Sweat,’ Sarah Everts answers all of our writer’s questions about perspiration

When you start a new sport, everything will be hard, perplexing, and intimidating. But your brain will be on fire.

In an excerpt from his new book 'Beginners: The Joy and Transformative Power of Lifelong Learning,' Outside contributing editor Tom Vanderbilt takes up surfing as part of an experiment to learn new skills as an adult and discover the benefits of being a grown-up novice

Coronavirus hasn't stopped Italian heartthrob and two-wheeled avenger Vittorio Brumotti from righting society's wrongs. The cyclist has delighted audiences with his TV news segment "100% Brumotti," shaming people for parking in handicapped spaces and taking on no less than the Mafia. We ride along with Italy's favorite bike hero.

The Wahoo Kickr is one of many expensive indoor bicycle trainers. Here's a serious review of a machine that will never see a ride under the open sky.

Renowned architect Bjarke Ingels has crafted an epic synthetic slope on top of a massive waste-to-energy plant

I got my wife and daughter to love cycling—with a little help from Italy

Like the rest of us, Tom Vanderbilt was dreaming of a new kind of vacation. He wanted adventure and a physical challenge, but also a trip that would appeal to his wife and young daughter. The answer: swimming in the open ocean, day after wet, wild day.

The former white-boy rapper and mega-successful serial entrepreneur has become a bestselling wellness author and Tony Robbins-style life coach. His latest venture, a highly social weekend of walking up mountains until you drop, called 29029, is pitched as a new breed of restorative endurance event. But is this just a brutal group hike with good marketing?

As the minimalism trend enters a curious new phase that has clothing makers like Mac Bishop of Wool and Prince showing us how to get through a year with only a few pairs of underwear, one brave adventurer attempts to defend his gear closet

New York's Citi Bike, one of the largest bike-share programs in the world, relies on a volunteer army to help redistribute some 12,000 bicycles among 750 stations each day, ensuring that users can grab a ride when they need one. Most of these volunteers do a few out-of-the-way deliveries a month. Then there's Joe Miller, whose superhuman efforts seem to defy any plausible explanation.

Creating a workplace that truly makes us happy and healthy takes a lot more than standing desks and on-site yoga. Thankfully, new research has sparked a growing design revolution.

Our writer spent a week riding bikes with the founder of Clif Bar to learn about the next great innovations in the performance fuel space

Living the dream has never been easy in the West's most beloved adventure hamlets, where homes are a fortune and good jobs are few. But the rise of online short-term rentals may be the tipping point that causes idyllic outposts like Crested Butte, Colorado, to lose their middle class altogether—and with it, their soul.

Fueled by Pop-Tarts and Little Debbies, 52-year-old software engineer Kurt Searvogel is out to break the record for the greatest distance pedaled in a year. What motivates a man to ride more than 200 miles a day—every day, rain or shine, hot or cold, sunrise to sunset?

Each year, in the rolling hills and strade bianche of Tuscany, thousands of riders set out to conquer challenging climbs and tricky descents on pre-1987 equipment (drop-tube shifters, non-aero brake hoods, toe cages). Two years ago, I rode that L'Eroica course. This year, the event came, for the first time, to California. Here they drop the ‘L’ and call it, simply: Eroica. I wasn’t going to miss it.

Research almost any travel destination and you'll probably wind up on travel-industry Goliath, where passionate people praise and denounce everything from romantic getaways to cockroach-infested hotel rooms. But who can you trust?

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