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Join us for a live Zoom Q and A with the beloved author, presented by the Outside Book Club, on Tuesday, April 5

Is there anything better than seeing kids having fun outside? 

In his new book, ‘Sounds Wild and Broken,’ the award-winning ecologist and writer dives into the history and diversity of our planet’s soundscapes in effort to get us to pay attention before they disappear

Set far from dramatic mountain peaks, the movie stays true to a gentler side of the state

Buying a house just so you can rent it out on Airbnb is lame. And predatory.

The American downhill skier may not have won a medal in Beijing, but he got the most style points by far

Joey Santore’s YouTube channel, Crime Pays but Botany Doesn’t, crosses citizen science with vigilante environmentalism

The Netflix film tells the true story of an early 20th-century explorer and his engineer fighting to survive in the Arctic. We talked to the ‘Game of Thrones’ star about what it was like filming on location in Greenland and Iceland in extreme conditions.

How boredom and booze created an outlaw sport best left alone

Outside columnist Brendan Leonard investigates his relationship to nostalgia, happiness, and type-two fun

Our March pick is Cheryl Strayed’s classic memoir of hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. We’ll conclude the conversation with a live Zoom Q and A on April 5.

After months of pandemic-induced isolation, one Vermont family dove headfirst into a 272-mile adventure

I’ve lived in a van for a year. It sucks, and now I’m ready to change things up.

Earth-loving New Yorkers are drawing from an unlikely arsenal of activism, hip-hop, marathon city-council Zoom meetings, and one sassy pug to hold the city to its zero-waste commitments. If they succeed, the environmental benefits could be huge.

‘Normal Gossip,’ a book about navigation, and ‘Abbott Elementary’

Whether on the Olympic stage or the home hill, women on skis demonstrate what sportsmanship, bravery, and self-love could look like

A ‘Washington Post’ story on Greg Gianforte’s latest hunting escapades is misleading, which is a shame, because its subject deserves much more scrutiny

Science shows that spending time outdoors can help with all kinds of serious ailments. So why not a broken heart?

After her 25-year marriage ended in divorce, the Outside contributing editor turned to science—and a river trip—to navigate through the darkness. Register here for our Zoom book discussion on March 9.

Thanks to female characters Bryce Kellogg and Robin Hand, women in ski towns have a timeless manifesto to follow

I’m on a quest to learn to love the body I’m in but afraid to push my limits outside

Some runners swear by their pump playlists, but I’d rather listen to a great book

Let your grom take the lead and you’ll both learn new tricks and become better skiers for it

Professional skier Markus Eder had a fantasy of an impossible descent. Then he got creative.

I want to thru-hike part of the AT or PCT, but I’m the main caregiver in my household

Keep guests comfortable with this advice around the best food, drink, and gear for cold-weather grilling

In his new book ‘Wayward: Stories and Photographs,’ Chris Burkard takes readers behind the camera on his quest for meaningful experiences

A poet laureate’s memoir, ‘Station Eleven,’ and a lacrosse film based on a true story

I’m not convinced I can be with someone who isn’t into the same kind of adventures as me

The messed up rugs, destroyed childhood mementos, and complicated travel plans? Completely worth it.

When Outside contributing editor Florence Williams’s husband of 25 years left her, she paddled the Green River to process her grief. Her new book recounts that story and dives into the science of the heart.

Reeling from her husband’s request to divorce after 25 years of marriage and two kids, Florence Williams was experiencing debilitating grief. An accomplished reporter, she decided to explore the science of heartache to see if she could find a cure. In this excerpt from her new book, ‘Heartbreak: A Personal and Scientific Journey,’ she heads out for a 120-mile solo paddle on Utah’s Green River, with a too heavy portable toilet and a shattered heart.

The precocious author’s debut release was the December-January pick for the Outside Book Club. We spoke with him about his journey along the Magdalena, Colombia’s longest waterway, and his attempt to understand the quickly changing country

Watching your dog age is one of the hardest parts of having a pet. Make their life comfortable and full of joy, and they’ll know how much you love them until the very end.

From the perfect pot to the best cheese-sauce recipe, here’s how to throw the best après fondue party

The Twitter famous saurologist and cofounder of Black AF in STEM is helping to build a more inclusive scientific community—and spotting some very sneaky lizards along the way

As the planet warms, wine regions like Napa are being forced to make some major adaptations. But that’s also presented opportunities for innovation.

While getting his PhD in English, Logan Scherer developed an intense friendship with a male grad student that lasted for years, through his friend’s engagement and marriage to a woman. Scherer struggled to make sense of it, until he lost himself in a group of spinster nature writers from the late 19th century who eschewed marriage to live alone or with other women during a time when the language of queerness didn’t exist.

Marshall Sella started as an intern at Outside in Chicago in 1988, and he went on to a successful career as a magazine writer in New York. His friends and former colleagues will remember him as much for his infectious humor and generous spirit. Here, his editor recalls the impact a young man had on a magazine still finding its voice.

Fitness comes and goes. Allow Glen Plake to make a case for prioritizing style—that elusive athletic skill that endures.

When you get creative with natural materials in parks, some call it art; others call it litter

By portraying predators as villains, we are influencing how our children perceive the natural world

Cahill’s stories and rollicking misadventures around the world have made this publication what it is today. Here he talks about his role in the creation of Outside magazine, choking down snake blood and gallbladder cocktails in the name of journalism, and how he came back from the dead after a frigid swim in the Grand Canyon’s biggest rapid.

The stories we were most excited to read and publish across Outside titles this year

This year’s most memorable adventure films include ‘The Rescue,’ ‘14 Peaks,’ and ‘Playing with Sharks’ 

What makes a queer person choose to live in an outdoorsy hot spot instead of an urban gayborhood?

38 quotes that we interpret for our own needs

The actor’s nature show, now streaming on Disney+, offers a welcome update to a familiar format

The podcast ‘FOGO’ captures a comedian’s quest to discover what she’s been missing in the outdoors

Some of this year’s best outdoorsy reads include new works from Alison Bechdel, Imbolo Mbue, and Mary Roach

America’s youth are in desperate need of real-life human connection. The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame bassist says there’s no better place to provide that than a skate park.

Be the hero this holiday season with specialty food packages for vegetarians and meat eaters alike

The Outside contributing editor’s latest release was the November pick for the Outside Book Club. We spoke with her about the appeal of chasing powder and the many crises facing the ski industry.

In her new novel, the award-winning author takes an especially pessimistic view of the climate crisis—but this isn’t the time to give up

Earlier this year, journalist Amelia Arvesen participated in a ride for bicycling safety that ended in tragedy. Months later, she’s still figuring out how to process what she saw.

After moving to San Diego, one writer took her husband and sons on a five-day urban hike to explore and better understand their new stomping grounds

Working as a camp counselor teaches you important skills that could jump-start your career

Fifty years after its release, it’s time to unwrap the messages embedded in the game

Hunter S. Thompson, Taylor Swift, and ‘King Richard’

In an excerpt from his new book, ‘There and Back: Photographs from the Edge,’ the renowned climber and filmmaker recounts a 2003 expedition with snowboarder Stephen Koch

Jordan Salama’s new book is an impressive debut by an up-and-coming travel writer

Author Jordan Salama began writing this captivating book, about a journey down Colombia’s Magdalena River, when he was just a college student

Cooking wild game can be scary—but it shouldn’t be. Allow Wes Siler to explain.

It’s been another challenging year, but some people thrive on adversity. Here are the athletes, activists, tree planters, chefs, filmmakers, and other disrupters who changed our world for the better in 2021. Plus: Meet Carissa Moore, surfing’s first female olympic gold medalist.

In the UST film ‘This Is My Story: Tony Galbreath II,’ Galbreath shares what it’s like being a Black man in a managerial role in the outdoor industry today

The film will premiere for general audiences this spring, marking the 40th anniversary of the tragedy

The new Netflix documentary chronicles Nirmal Purja’s journey to summit the planet’s 8,000-meter peaks in less than seven months

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Want your children to have a deeper relationship with nature than you do? So did this writer. She found an entry point in Tinkergarten.

What to do if you followed your dream, only to realize it wasn’t what you wanted after all

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Hoping to help my brother beat his alcohol addiction, I set up a two-wheel road trip through the scenic terrain of northeast Kansas. As usual, he was funny, endearing, maddening, and burdened by problems I couldn’t solve.

We don’t need paracord-wrapped hatchets and trenching tools to survive in the wilderness

Watch and learn as Wes Siler demonstrates a more entertaining and more flavorful way to whip up this year’s Thanksgiving feast outdoors.

For as far back as she can remember, Mardi Fuller grew up in a world of swimming lessons and swim teams, which was unusual for a daughter of Jamaican immigrants. Why the emphasis on water? Because of a mysterious death that haunted her family’s past.