Pack a camp kitchen like a pro.
Pack a camp kitchen like a pro. (Illustration: Nguyen Tran)

Six Camp Kitchen Essentials—And How to Pack Them

Never lose a camp mug or fork again

Pack a camp kitchen like a pro.
Image

Outside's long reads email newsletter features our strongest writing, most ambitious reporting, and award-winning storytelling about the outdoors. Sign up today.

A good camp kitchen starts with being organized. Here, we’ve rounded up our favorite tools to help with that task, as long as some tips and tricks for packing. 

1. A Good Bin

I like the SidioCrate (from $42)—it’s light and customizable, thanks to inserts that let you change the interior layout. Water runs through holes in the bottom, so you needn’t worry about spills.

2. An All-in-One Kitchen

Camp-ready pots and pans can all be bought separately, but it’s easier (and sometimes cheaper) to buy a complete set that nests together. I’m a longtime fan of the 21-piece Stanley’s Base Camp cookset ($90), which includes a 3.7-quart pot with a lid, a frying pan, a spatula and serving spoon, a dish-drying rack, and four plates, bowls, and sporks.

3. A Basic Pantry

I keep staples in the bin, but it’s best to pack most food in another container or a cooler.

4. Cleanup Supplies

To wash all that nice cookware, I pack dish soap, a sponge, and a collapsible sink (not pictured) that holds up to 16 liters—perfect for a large meal.

5. A Chef’s Knife

A good knife is probably the most important tool in the bin.

6. Coffee

Leave the fancy pour-over setup at home: it’s not worth the hassle. A Jetboil Flash ($115) heats water absurdly fast—once it’s boiling, add a stick of Mount Hagen’s instant, freeze-dried coffee ($11 for 25) for a brew that will appease even the staunchest coffee snobs.

From July/August 2022 Lead Illustration: Nguyen Tran

promo logo
sms