Health

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Outside magazine, July 1999 The Righteous Gitis The Diving Dig | The Cartwheel | The Figure Four | Take the Stairs | The Crossover Dribble…

Bodywork, March 1997 Regiments: Options for the Discriminating Stretcher By Scott Sutherland When choosing from the stretching smorgasbord, think of creating a well-balanced meal. “Learning more than one method allows you to stretch more effectively,” says Bob Anderson, author of Stretching. So…

Outside magazine, October 1994 Strategies: Slow Down and Release the Insulin By Mark Jannot Insomnia is the thinking man’s disease: “Anything that causes you to reflect or act while you’re in bed,” says Wilse B. Webb, author of Sleep, the Gentle Tyrant, the definitive text…

Bodywork, May 1997 Be a Thigh Master And you’ll prep the rest of your leg muscles for a summer of fun By Jim Harmon Not that you need a reminder, but the time has come to leave the gym behind.

Outside magazine, February 1999 Finishing Strong You’re leaner, harder, wiser. Now comes the fun part: putting it to use. The grand finale of the Outside Fitness Plan shows you how to clean the competition’s clock, no…

Bodywork, April 1997 Routines: Get Shipshape in Five Weeks By Lolly Merrell “Most paddlers concentrate on building up their big arm muscles over the winter,” says two-time World Cup champion kayaker Scott Shipley. “Trouble is, they don’t realize that the neck, shoulders,…

Outside magazine, September 1996 Prescriptions: The Pollen Factor By Jim Rosenthal Ah, autumn: a time for active allergy sufferers to breathe a sigh of relief. In certain parts of the country, though, you might not want to breathe too deep. If you’re among the…

Outside magazine, August 1995 Curl When They Least Expect It Just when your muscles are getting the hang of a weight-lifting regimen, it’s time to shake things up By Ken McAlpine Three days a week for a year now, I’ve ducked into…

Outside magazine, July 1994 Regimens: Upward Progression By Dana Sullivan Hill climbing is Dede Demet’s little training weapon. The 21-year-old U.S. National Cycling Team member and 1993 World Championships silver medalist attributes a lot of her success to the fact that she likes pedaling uphill. “It’s…

Outside magazine, February 1996 With a Little More Lard? The question of carbohydrates has become a loaded one of late–and fat could be an athlete’s answer By Andrew Tilin Professional triathlete Wendy Ingraham had a day of dietary reckoning a couple of…

Fitness ’97, February 1997 Pasta À la Allen Mark Allen’s dietary beliefs may differ from those of his peers-still, once a triathlete, always a triathlete. Which means pasta. But Allen makes sure to add calories from sources other than carbohydrates to balance his meal, as…

Outside magazine, June 1995 Prescriptions: How to Heal Creature Discomforts By Kiki Yablon In the world of wilderness first aid, Bill “Doc” Forgey wrote the book. In fact, the Merrillville, Indiana-based physician has penned or contributed to a daypack-load of them, most recently the…

Outside magazine, September 1995 Intake: Energy Bar Alternatives By Dana Sullivan There’s no disputing the convenience of energy bars. There’s also no disputing that when you have the luxury of loading up at home before a workout, your kitchen cabinet holds fuels that are…

The Downhill Report, December 1996 No Pain…No Pain Speed, spray, and an intact bone structure! Cruising is where it’s at. By Adam Horowitz They’re but four syllables. Three, really, if you account for redundancy. They form a pedantic, infantile schoolyard taunt,…

 Outside magazine, February 1999 Cross-Country Ski Your Way to Shining Health, Renewed Vigor, and Everlasting Happiness! Life got you down? Feeling morose, slaggardly, low on essence? Ah, dear friend, you need the curative powers contained within a…

By positing a heretical theory of nutrition, Barry Sears unleashed a multimillion-dollar monster. Now, with his credibility and nest egg hanging in the balance, he's trying to get his creation back under control.

Outside magazine, December 1998 The Perfect Fit ù Part Three A good workout doesn’t end with the body ù you’ve also got to train your brain By Paul Keegan Jim Loehr It’s cold and…

Outside magazine, July 1995 Regimens: Workouts in No Time Flat By Mark Jannot You bet interval training hurts–all the more reason to get it over with at the lunch break, when office obligations force you to keep things brief. Here’s a high-intensity training sampler…

Outside magazine, December 1995 Yoga with a Twist Flexibility and meditation, you bet. But astanga also delivers a Western-style workout. By John Brant I took my last yoga class in 1977, when both the world and the discipline being taught were profoundly…

Outside magazine, March 1996 Regimens: The Calisthenic Challenge By Ken McAlpine “For calisthenics to be effective, you have to resist the urge to rest when the burning sensation in your muscles comes along,” says Mark De Lisle. “That’s where you’ll make great gains.” If…

Outside magazine, July 1999 Hang Ten The Diving Dig | The Cartwheel | The Figure Four | Take the Stairs | The Crossover Dribble |…

If any lesson stuck during physical education class, it was probably “stretch but don't bounce!” Bouncing, we were darkly warned, would lead to certain injury, from muscular microtears to flayed hamstrings. But, hey, what did Coach know? That well-worn admonition no longer rings true. Bouncing has had a 1990s image…

Outside magazine, November 1995 Intake: Water on the Mountain By Suzanne Schlosberg You wouldn’t think of going on a three-hour bike ride without a water bottle or two. But get on the ski slope, where your equipment doesn’t boast handily mounted water-bottle cages, and…

Bodywork, May 1997 Medicine Stocking up the athlete’s home pharmacy By Daryn Eller Far be if from us to suggest that your next run down a rocky trail could leave you battered and bruised. Still, accidents happen, and it’s better…

Outside magazine, April 1996 Strategies: Running Right By Mark Jannot While Stu Mittleman is mostly known for preaching slow going, that’s only half his equation: He’s just as likely to take you to task for your form. “Any time your body isn’t aligned,…

Bodywork, April 1997 The Creed for Speed How to break through your performance firewall By Ken McAlpine Calculations Testing Your Limits Intervals wouldn’t be useful without a credible figure for your anaerobic threshold heart rate, the level of exertion…

Outside magazine, September 1996 These Bladders Were Made For Moving Defeating dehydration on road or trail By Bob Howells TWO GALLONS OF WATER PER PERSON PER day gets heavy (a gallon weighs eight pounds), not to mention bulky. How to carry…

Outside magazine, August 1995 Regimens: Building Your Muscles by Surprise By Ken McAlpine With a nod to Nietzsche, that which wastes you makes you stronger. And the best way to thoroughly exhaust your muscles isn’t to do the same regimen over and over, but…

Outside magazine, August 1995 Don’t miss: Our special online forum with epidemiologist James Mills Health: Warning–Killer Microbes Next 20 Miles Is hantavirus lurking in your favorite neck of the woods? By Miles Harvey…

Outside magazine, March 1999 Who Needs Steroids? The legal (if odd) new way to give yourself a boost By Rob Coppolillo Blood-doping or injecting yourself with EPO may have alluring results, but shouldn’t there be…

Fitness ’97, February 1997 Strength Because you’re not just getting bigger. You’re getting better. Are We There Yet? Two decades of fitness grail-seeking, including a misstep or two from the master himself 1993 Maybe it…

Outside magazine, June 1995 Keeping in Step with Summer Preparation for these sunny times shouldn’t stop at the quads or biceps. Your feet need a hand, too. By Sara Corbett Summertime–when we trot up and down mountains, sashay through 10k races, leap…

Outside magazine, September 1995 Get All Your Muscles in a Row For a superior full-body workout, take a sliding seat By John Brant A pair of trick sunglasses has made Vesko Nenchev’s day. They’re cheap specs that a friend found in a…

Outside magazine, January 1998 Review The Streamlined Home Gym How to choose a sport-specific machine for automatic fitness By Patrick Leyland THE STREAMLINED HOME GYM | ESSENTIALS | THE OTHER…

Outside Magazine, February 1995 Turning Winter into Spring Training Forget about waiting for the thaw. There’s a foot of fresh resistance out there. By Mark Jannot Ray Browning takes the same approach to winter training as every other world-class triathlete: He heads…

Outside magazine, December 1999 Page: 1 | 2 | 3 Learn from Those Who Fell Before You Think injuries are a necessary evil? According to Dr. William Sterett, an orthopedist at Vail’s Steadman-Hawkins…

Outside magazine, July 1995 Skills: How to Hone Your Peripheral Vision By Sandy Blakeslee As a child, Bill Bradley, U.S. senator from New Jersey and former New York Knicks star forward, would walk down the streets of his hometown, keeping his eyes focused straight…

Outside magazine, December 1995 How to Get All Bent into Shape By Stephanie Pearson “Yoga’s aim is to connect the mind and body in friendship,” says Holiday Johnson, director of the Health and Fitness Yoga Center in Portland, Oregon, and instructor to many mountaineers,…

Outside magazine, April 1999 Plop, Plop, Chug, Chug Portable relief for athletic thirst By Michael Kessler “I can’t reveal my secret,” whispers Fred Marius, proud creator of Psycho Fred’s Quic Disc, the first tablet that…

Outside magazine, July 1999 The Crossover Dribble The Diving Dig | The Cartwheel | The Figure Four | Take the Stairs | The Crossover Dribble…

Outside magazine, May 1996 Nutrition Mike Pigg’s secret to success? A little glycogen goes a long way By Mark Jannot Not long ago, Mike Pigg was your typical endurance athlete: a glutton for carbohydrates. “I was having pasta-eating contests, downing 6,000…

Outside magazine, November 1995 Strategies: The Video Verite Approach to ACL Aid By Kiki Yablon There’s no sound a skier dreads more than the fabled pop. And when U.S. Skiing’s Diann Roffe heard it on December 19, 1990, she was third overall in the…

Bodywork, May 1997 Prescriptions: Getting the Kinks Out By Alan Coté Flat tires may be an unavoidable unpleasantry of cycling, but the dull, achy tightness in your neck and shoulders after a two-hour ride is a nuisance you can avoid and something…

Outside magazine, April 1996 Training: The Pre-Approach Approach By Jim Rosenthal To become a better climber, get out and climb: The sport is so specific that it’s difficult to simulate with weights. So for pre- and midseason training, hit the rock gym at least…

Bodywork, April 1997 Strategies: Lactic Acid Loopholes By Ken McAlpine Pain may be the unfortunate constant when coping with lactic acid, but there are a few salvations. Say you find yourself suffering on an ambitious outing–quads burning, lungs heaving, mind wishing you…

Bodywork, July 1998 Side Saddled? A two-step plan for taking the pain in stride By Scott Sutherland The cause of the infamous side cramp may be obscure, but the remedy is painfully simple. “When you feel one…

Outside magazine, September 1996 Altitude Sickness, From Bad to Worse By Katie Arnold In the dicey world of mountaineering, one thing is certain: Stay above 25,000 feet long enough and you will die. “The communication between your brain and your organs falters,” explains…

Here's the deal: Ten breakthrough workouts from the best fitness experts and coaching pros around. Great tips for nutrition, gear, and fine-tuning your form. Killer ideas to keep you motivated. Ten high-performance meals you can prepare in less than ten minutes. It's everything you need to start fresh, keep your options wide open, and realize your fitness dream

Learn how to do all the essential exercises, from basics like the bench press to advanced medicine-ball moves, in our ONLINE WORKOUT GLOSSARY.Coming April 23…

Can Underwear Make You Stronger?* fitness tips *No, but it sure looks (and feels) that way Who knew that a stretchy T-shirt made from a more breathable version of the fabric found in ladies’ girdles would become the base layer of choice for athletes as diverse as baseball…

Meet your secret muscles—and find out how these hidden assets can leverage your leap to peak performance

Travel can be a minefield of fatigue, jet lag, strange food, and fitness regimens shot to hell. It doesn't have to be that way. With our road-warrior plan, you can fight back—and win.

We're going to show you how to find your flow. The place where everything clicks and comes easy.

LISTEN UP: There's way more to achieving peak fitness than strength and cardio training. Here's how to unite body, mind, and soul to transform yourself into a Whole Athlete

I will be going hiking and kayaking in Hawaii next summer, but I concerned about the sun because of my very fair complexion. What are some good choices for clothing to help protect me from the ravages of the sun? Jeff Minneapolis, Minnesota

As anybody who's been hiking on the West Coast knows, getting "poison oaked" is a miserable experience. So, have you ever heard of Zanfel? According to the company's Web site, this soap is supposed to remove the urushiol from poison oak even after you get the rash. Unfortunately, it's really expensive—about $40 for a one-ounce tube! Does this stuff really work, or is it just snake oil? Rusty San Francisco, California

Stuart Stevens’s November story “Drug Test,” on the use of performance-enhancing substances in sports, incorrectly reported that cyclist Alexi Grewal, who won a road-racing gold medal at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, prepared for that year’s competition with the use of blood packing, a transfusion technique that increases…

Everybody knows that many athletes cheat by using performance-enhancing drugs like steroids, testosterone, and EPO. But what is it like to take these banned substances? Do they really help you win? To find out, we sent an amateur cyclist into the back rooms of sports medicine, where he just said yes to the most controversial chemicals in sports.

How is weight training for snowboarding different from weight training for skiing? Anne Davis Boulder, Colorado

I get sunburned every time I go skiing. What SPF should I be looking for in my sunblock? Dian Goodspeed Albany, New York

The brave new world is coming—fast. With sci-fi fantasy turning into performance-enhancing reality, we separate the hype from breakthroughs you can use.

Can you recommend a trail running shoe that offers good ankle support? Most trail shoes are low- or mid-cut. I have weak ankles from years of basketball (sprains and a few breaks) and I'm looking for a high-top shoe to help prevent ankle rolls. Mark Stubbs Aliso Viejo, California

Boy would I like your job! Anyway, next year I plan on doing some multi-day trail runs, so wanted some pack recommendations. These will most likely be overnight excursions, and there'll be two of us, so we can distribute tent components. So, what pack would you recommend to carry all my gear (half the tent, lightweight sleeping bag, some light wet-weather gear, food, water, sundries)? I was looking at packs around the 26-litre mark, but wondering if that'd be enough. Rob London, United Kingdom

Beta-tested by Olympians and elite athletes, the wizardry of neuromuscular training will hardwire you for peak performance

Bill Phillips, the most successful fitness author in history, is a Colorado recluse who got his start teaching muscleheads how to use steroids. He's cleaned up his act—his Body-for-Life program runs street legal, and it works—but he's still banking on a timeless American urge: Everybody wants to be huge.

Pass the summer splash test with these rowdy water fitness contests

Are the vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients packed into everything you chug and chew the real secret to becoming a finely tuned sports superstar? Turn the page.

It sounds too good to be true: a star miler turned criminal goes to prison, links up with a legendary track coach, trains behind bars until his feet bleed, and earns a spot on the U.S. Olympic team. Is the real world ready for Jon Gill's dream?

Forget the creepy promise of techno-longevity. Instead, take our advice: Live fast, die hard, and leave behind a worn-out, used-up, good-looking corpse.

The Fountain of Youth is a myth. But take heart: Intelligent training and an adventurous spirit will keep you running, kicking, screaming at the peak of your potential for years to come.

Juliet Draper may be the fittest firewoman alive: 185 pounds of chiseled, hollering, highly motivated tenacity. Now she wants to go global, teaching firehouse heroes everywhere how to shape up. Sounds like a pipe dream—but are you going to tell her to back off?

The fittest firewoman alive is transforming her colleagues into elite athletes. When she's done with them, she's coming after you.

Want an easy plan to prepare you to climb a mountain—say, 14,494-foot Mount Whitney? Here's a five-week program that'll whip you into summit-worthy shape.

Grueling workouts are the only way to get ready for long-distance endurance, right? Wrong.

If mom had told you what fruits and veggies can do for your game, maybe you would've listened. But it's not too late.

Here's a one-day meal plan fit for a noontime event or workout.

This month in New Zealand, the crew of Oracle/BMW will try to win the America’s Cup with the help of some unorthodox conditioning: grunting up and over sand dunes, terra firma’s closest approximation of a yacht rolling at sea.

Once the pleasure of a few professional masochists, grueling adventure sports are suddenly a national rage

With $100,000 for the winners, the world's most relentless teams, and a 138,000-vertical-foot Rocky Mountain course, the Subaru Primal Quest seemed poised to give big-time adventure racing a smashing return to U.S. soil. But then the race began—and all hell broke loose. A front-line report from the wildest, bumpiest game in the wilderness.