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We’re relieved that cooler weather is here, along with opportunities to wear something besides sandals and shorts. (Photo: Jakob Schiller)

Our Favorite New Men’s Fall Apparel and Accessories

Here’s what we’re wearing

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Many of us experienced one of the hottest summers on record. We’re relieved that cooler weather is here, along with opportunities to wear something besides sandals and shorts. Below are some of my favorite fall pieces, with an emphasis on quality, craftsmanship, and longevity.

Flint and Tinder Wool Overshirt ($170)

(Photo: Jakob Schiller)

Thanks to a textured outer and details like reinforced elbows, this overshirt has a timeless vibe and could easily be a piece from your grandpa’s closet. I’ve been wearing it into the office, but its thick and tough wool/polyester blend is durable enough for yard work. When temps get really cold, I’ll layer a chunky vest on top. Here are some other overcoats I’m excited about.

  • Orvis Pro Insulated Shirt Jacket ($180): Smart tailoring makes this shirt jacket feel like a svelte button-down flannel, yet it’s significantly warmer thanks to the 40 grams of PrimaLoft Gold Active insulation inside.
  • Outdoor Research Feedback Shirt Jacke ($150): This piece is the definition of cozy—a thick flannel shirt lined with fleece and stuffed with recycled insulation. It’s too bulky to wear to work, but I’ve found it to be the perfect fall layer for chilly evenings at camp.

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Black Diamond Mission Wool Denim Pants ($150)

(Photo: Jakob Schiller)

When I saw that Black Diamond blended wool into its denim, I knew I had to try it. The wool adds a nice dose of warmth to these stretchy jeans, so they’re great for climbing, hiking, or bike commuting on colder days. The stylish fit pairs well with a button-down and leather boots. I’ve also been testing and liking these other new pants.

  • Flint and Tinder 365 Corduroy Pants ($108): Corduroy is making a comeback, and this is my go-to pair because spandex is blended into the cotton for added mobility. Flint and Tinder also offers them in plenty of fun throwback colors.
  • Taylor Stitch The Atelier & Repairs Chino ($220): Taylor Stitch took overstock chinos and handed them over to Atelier & Repairs to sew on unused fabric patches. The result is a one-of-a-kind pant that looks vintage but will last for years.

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Forloh AllClima SoftShell Jacket ($400)

(Photo: Jakob Schiller)

Soft shells fell out of favor for a couple years—everyone gravitated to hard shells because they were lighter, thinner, and almost always waterproof—but soft shells are making a strong comeback. I’m a fan because even though soft shells are heavier than a waterproof nylon shell, the stretch fabric moves well with my body, adds heat, is much quieter, and is highly breathable. This version is one of my favorites because it’s totally waterproof and air-permeable, sourced in the United States, and comes with smart features like pit zips and a large, adjustable hood. The other soft shell jacket I’ve been liking is the Arc’teryx Gamma MX Hoody ($350). It’s the most well-cut jacket I’ve ever worn, with a slim, flattering fit yet plenty of room to move. Unlike the AllClima, it’s not waterproof, but it shakes off a light rain, cuts the wind, and adds just the right amount of comfort for any temperature in between 40 to 65 degrees.

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Filson Ballistic Nylon Duffel Backpack Hybrid ($245)

(Photo: Jakob Schiller)

Many of you probably have a trusty old North Face or Patagonia duffel bag that you use for most trips. Those bags are great, but they’re often too big for a quick weekend adventure—the most common kind of outing for us nine-to-five folks. To fill in the gap, I’ve been using this 47-liter Filson duffel, which is big enough to hold three days’ worth of gear—including jackets—but not so big that my stuff swims around in it. It has backpack straps and a couple well-placed pockets that hold smaller items, and it’s made from 600-denier ballistic nylon with bridle leather accents, giving it that classic Filson build quality that will last forever. Another beautiful bag I’ve been testing is the Bleu de Chauffe Bologne BDC Camera Bag ($425), which I use when walking around the city. Handmade in France, the Bologne is built from an environmentally friendly vegetable-tanned and totally waterproof leather. It also comes with a high-quality leather strap and buckles. Inside, there’s padding and space for a mirrorless camera and two lenses, plus your digital cards and extra batteries. The leather is so robust that I’ll be passing this bag on to my kids.

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Rhodes Footwear Blake Boot ($200)

(Photo: Jakob Schiller)

Blundstone boots are a staple of the mountain-town wardrobe. I’m a fan of the brand, but I’ve  branched out, and now my favorite is the Blake. A chunkier sole and an additional leather panel on the front make them a little more rugged and look more like the kind of work boot you’d see on a ranch. They were immediately comfortable out of the box, so I didn’t need to worry about breaking them in. I’ve worn them into the office, on short hikes, and for yard work. I also got my hands on a pair of 350 Cutters from White’s Boots ($620). White’s is famous for making the most durable leather boots on the market and has long catered to loggers, lineworkers, and wildland firefighters. The 350 comes with that same build quality: they’re handmade and include replaceable Vibram soles but aren’t quite as stiff as White’s work offerings. Some breaking in is necessary, but after a few wears they were as comfy as tennis shoes.

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Stetson The Explorer Hat ($95)

(Photo: Jakob Schiller)

It takes confidence to wear a Stetson, but I encourage you to try because they’re beautiful hats that add western style to any outfit. The Explorer is a good intro: it’s more affordable, and the wool felt build is totally crushable, so you can throw it in a bag and not worry about ruining the shape. The wool adds warmth on cooler days yet breathes well and wicks sweat when I’m out for a hike. Plus, the 2.5-inch brim has been great at keeping sun off my nose and neck. If you want to take your Stetson game up a notch, check out the Filson x Stetson Eagle Ranch Hat ($300). While it isn’t crushable, it has a more refined appearance and comes with several nice build qualities: the outside is high-quality rabbit fur, and the interior features a satin lining and a leather sweatband.

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Lead Photo: Jakob Schiller

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