Afghanistan


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A year after Bonnie Carroll's husband, U.S. Army brigadier general Tom Carroll, died, she devoted her life to caring for those who’d lost loved ones from war. For widowed women in Afghanistan, this called for more than emotional support.

In July, a group of Afghan women set out to climb 24,580-foot Mount Noshaq, their country's highest mountain. No Afghan woman had ever reached the summit, and many challenges stood in their way, from hostile Afghan men who think that women shouldn't exercise, to the terrorist attack in a district near the peak two days before the climb began. This is their story.

Despite nearby Taliban attacks, the 24-year-old reached the top of 24,580-foot Mount Noshaq—the first woman from her country ever to do so

The creator behind 'Afghan Cycles' and 'Catch It' is bringing new athlete role models to life on the big screen

In buzkashi, Afghanistan’s violent and ancient national pastime, riders battle for control of an animal corpse that they carry toward a goal. Sixteen years after the U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban, the sport is dominated by rival warlords who will do anything to maintain power in a turbulent country that once again is up for grabs.

Our former editor on finding the embodiment of the unkillable idea of literate badass adventure

Funding the difficult recovery period with footwear

The sport still has a long way to go, but these leaders are pushing for more diversity

Contributing editor Patrick Symmes has traveled the world with these essentials, including guidebooks, earplugs, and decoy wallets

A legendary war photographer now leaves his Leicas at home

Zainab, the first woman to complete a marathon in the country, is leading the charge to get more women involved in athletics

The guys at Combat Flip Flops think so and they've maxed out their credit cards to prove it

A new study shows that climbing teams from countries with rigid social structures are more likely to summit Himalaya mountains—but also more likely to die trying. Can the data predict summit success?

Syria is an enthusiastic state sponsor of terrorism and a fiendish fan of torture and oppression. But have you tried the stuffed grape leaves? Patrick Symmes invades before the coalition of the willing can.

The border between Afghanistan and Pakistan is a lawless no-man's-land where violence and suffering rage, and no one has it harder than the region's 21 million Pashtun women. Their mode of rebellion? Short-verse poems called landays.

Three new trips in the world's wildest places

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