Agility and Balance


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Recent studies suggest that walking the webbing may boost balance, speed rehab, and keep your knees injury-free

Want to perform like a pro, even with the years piling up? Nick Heil got the deluxe treatment at Exos, a cutting-edge outfit that works with NFL players and soccer stars. He came out slimmer, stronger, and more focused—the perfect upgrade for anybody, at any age, who plays hard in the outdoors.

Pro skier Sage Cattabriga-Alosa lets us in on his preseason training hacks

Up your fat-tire game with these tips from eight of the sport’s very best

Jumping rope is for serious athletes, and a weighted, travel-friendly set is for serious rope jumpers

The top three mistakes and how to fix them

To simulate the unpredictability of your sport, add elements of randomness—and downright chaos—to your exercise regimen

Boost reaction time and reduce clumsiness on the field with these expert moves.

Stop that lawnmower! Your urban backyard is packed with hidden performance-enhancing plants that can be tossed together to make an ancestral wonder meal.

Keri Herman only started skiing seriously in her senior year of college. Now she's an Olympian. Here's how she turned her late start into a competitive advantage.

The Super Bowl virgin on running hills, eating yogurt, and guarding Revis Island.

Want to undo the damage of your desk job in 10 minutes? Crawl like a kid and start spinning like a Sufi monk.

It’s not just for elite athlete. Training alone—in the right dose—will make you a faster and more resilient athlete.

Specializing in one sport will take you only so far. To really break through, you'll need to branch out.

Make those nebulous resolutions last by turning them into habits. The key? The right reward.

Fact-checking trusted training maxims

Meet Chloe Kim, a snowboarding prodigy who threw her first backflip off a natural feature at age six. Next up: Aspen's X Games.

Strength is useless if you don't hone your agility—the skill of translating power into meaningful movement. And it all starts with mastering the "Kong vault."

More than 76 years ago, a visionary Australian coach had an epiphany that forged a generation of super-athletes: true fitness is all about translating fear into raw power.

One of the most surprising heroes of World War II was a pint-sized shepherd nicknamed The Clown—and his fitness wisdom can change your life.

When a longtime triathlete took on a Kokoro camp—a beyond-extreme fitness challenge modeled on the Navy's Hell Week for SEAL candidates—his first question was purely about the pain: Can I survive this? The second was more metaphysical: Should I even want to?

The two-time Olympian will lead the women’s national squad to the 2015 World Cup—and share her secrets to unleashing athletic potential.

Examining the perpetual youth and singular talent of surfing's king

More pain quest than workout, misogi is the secret, punishing ritual that has revolutionized Atlanta Hawks supershooter Kyle Korver's game. You have time for this—if it doesn't kill you first.

We don't know if the biohacking craze is full of snake-oil salesmen or prophets. Probably a little of both.

I hear the whole stunt-man thing is a great workout. Is it worth incorporating into my routine?

Face it, most of us aren't complete athletes. We lack the strength to make us fit, and we follow cultlike exercise programs. But there is a cure: Listen to renegade coach Mark Rippetoe, grab a barbell, and get back to basics.

A handful of years ago Rachel Brathen was a cigarette-smoking, rebellious teen in Sweden. Then she moved to Costa Rica, found yoga, booted up Instagram, and became a yoga celebrity—if there is such a thing.

Will leaping fiery hay bales amount to nothing more than an adrenaline-fueled fad? Or could it one day become an Olympic sport? That all depends on what comes next.

I like to exercise in the afternoon or evening, but I often feel too tired to motivate myself. Could a quick rest help?

Challenge your friends to a grueling drill-based challenge, then whoop their butts.

Sure, running five minutes a day will help you live longer, but it's not going to get you in shape—or even scrape the surface of your potential.

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