Telemark It wasn’t the stiffest boot, or the lightest, but the Push quietly won testers over with its ability to do it all. “One boot to drive anything in my quiver,” said one tester. The Push features adjustable forward lean, Boa lacing, and a thermomoldable liner that fit most testers…

A high cuff and fixed spine make the Shaman every bit as stiff as the best alpine freeride boots on the market. But because it comes with two soles—one ISO alpine and one rockered, ski-mountaineering sole—it's perfect for resort skiers who occasionally tour or boot-pack in search of better snow.

Good for Telemark While not a women-specific boot per se, the NTN-compatible TX is now available in women's sizes, providing testers with their first look at this sleek boot-and-binding system. Across the board, the results were clear: NTN provided our women the most arcing power they'd ever experienced. Bonus:…

Alpine Touring Built with a new steel-rod touring mechanism, the Mobe skis like a (softer) alpine boot with a walk mode and lug soles. Only it’s just eight pounds per pair—about 30 percent lighter than your average alpine boot. Add a booster strap, a rockered mountaineering sole, and tech fittings…

Want an AT boot that can hold its own when you stay inbounds? Try the new Diva, which has rigid dual-density plastic that makes it beefy where it needs to be, plus a hinged tongue for easy touring. 6.7 lbs; scarpa.com      …

Built with a women-specific anatomical liner and last, the Shiva got highest honors in fit and flex, balancing comfortable uphill mechanics with downhill dependability. “Super flex, and stiff enough for downhill, yet the walk mode feels like you're in slippers,” declared one tester. Tech fittings mean it's compatible with lighter-weight…

Alpine Touring The Quadrant’s four buckles, consistent flex, and 40 degrees of touring motion make it BD’s best all-mountain option yet. Testers praised the stout overlap upper cuff and the way the Boa closure system in the boot’s liner cradles your ankle. 7.8 lbs; TAGS: all mountain, Boa…

Women-specific gear should never be a softer, pinker version of the men's. That's why we love the four-buckle T1 Lady, which is as robust as the men's T1 but with a narrower heel fit and Scarpa's custom-moldable Intuition liner. 7.4 lbs; scarpa.com      …

Built for the NTN (New Telemark Norm) binding system, the three-buckle, one-piece, overlap-shell Prophet is softer and smoother than the first-gen NTN offerings, which were all about big power and big skis. “This is the only NTN boot to truly match the feel of a normal tele binding and boot,”…

Alpine Touring Game-changer alert! The price tag is no joke, but the TLT, with its full carbon-fiber upper cuff, boasts the best stiffness-to-weight ratio we’ve ever seen. It weighs less than five pounds, and it rips: The two-buckle lockdown system yields solid ski-to-boot power. Shave off a quarter of the…

Good for Touring If you're not an overly aggressive skier, or if you rarely or never ski in-bounds, a three-buckle boot like the Syner-G offers the perfect blend of smooth power on the way down and comfort on the way up. While it's not quite powerful enough to drive…

ALPINE TOURING Good for All Mountain Though it remains unchanged from last season, the Skookum proved itself an overall champ for its balanced uphill ergonomics and downhill chops. The interchangeable tongues are no gimmick: The downhill tongue stiffens the boot by 20 percent. It's easy to see why one…

Alpine Touring With its alpine buckle configuration and beefy power strap, the respectably light Shaka is one of the burliest women-specific boots on the market, capable of driving the biggest, fattest skis. Even better, it’s also Dynafit-compatible and, thanks to rockered soles, sure-footed in the backcountry. 7.2 lbs. TAGS:…

Good for Touring You can find a lighter AT boot, but our testers felt the Radium had the best downhill performance-to-weight ratio. Credit the Radium's alpine heritage—an overlap shell—and the Pebax reinforcements in the thermomoldable liner, which add stiffness but almost no weight. Walk mode is a little clunky,…

TELEMARK Good for All Mountain The four-buckle Custom overpowered the toughest bindings and even some testers. Those who could handle it gave it props for cuff/bellows flex and stiffness. As with other boots in BD's Power Series, the Custom's liner has a Boa closure system that clamps down hard…

Three-density, lace-up thermomoldable liners and efficient walking mode make skinning up comfortable and effortless, yet it's plenty stiff and powerful to drive big boards like the Sickbirds. 7.9 lbs; garmontusa.com   Bonus: The magnesium buckles reduce ice buildup.   Bummer: A bit roomy for folks with narrow feet.  …

Telemark Designed for the new, smaller NTN binding (above), the Priestess impressed us with its alpine-boot-inspired cuff, buckle placement, and overall ergonomics. Its only downside was that testers felt that the bellows were softer than they are on the men’s version of the boot. 7.1 lbs. TAGS: powerful, NTN-compatible…

Good for Big Mountain One boot for both AT and tele? Yup. Because the X Pro doesn't have a duckbill like traditional telemark boots, it's compatible with the new NTN binding. But thanks to its standard sole and Dynafit tech fittings, it also works with Dynafit AT bindings.

To put it simply, I want one boot to rule them all. Is there a single pair that works for mountaineering, splitboarding, and AT skiing? Or should I pull out a second mortgage on my house and buy three new pairs of sport-specific boots? Matthew Tacoma, Washington

I want an alpine touring boot that will allow me to climb, hike, and ski without trashing my feet. I can live with weaker downhill performance as long as I can spend multiple weeks on long traverses without being in serious pain. Are AT boot manufacturers figuring out a way to build a boot for the long traverse that has the forgiveness of, say, Scarpa's T2? Tony Vancouver, British Columbia

Hint: It's not the toboggan.

The Marker Duke binding changes everything. Until now, alpine-touring bindings—the heels release into a walk mode for ascending on climbing skins—compromised performance on the way down. Where earlier AT models forced the skier to totter on riser bars, about an inch off the ski, the Duke uses a flat plastic…

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