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Into the Deep Unknown ​​​​​​​from research institute Biographic follows deep-sea biologist Diva Amon as she showcases what the earth looks like at 3,280 feet below sea level.

In its quest to make the audience care about leading man Percy Fawcett, the blockbuster gives us a duller, sanitized version of the real-life explorer

A guide to the places where glory will be won—and where the victors will live, sleep, and train

Surfing is rife with stereotypes of laid-back, tanned athletes in tropical locales. But go beyond the surface and you’ll find some of the most interesting subcultures in sport, from bike-and-surf gangs to teenage girls who ride in Bangladesh.

Whirlpools, piranhas, and malaria don’t even make the list

Fulfill that childhood fantasy and book one of these high-end treehouses, from Costa Rica to Italy to San Francisco

From $6-a-night secrets to splurge-worthy resorts (and a few free urban oases), here’s where to escape the grind in a hammock.

Showering outside is one of life’s small pleasures. Discovering there’s one adjoining your hotel room is an enormous joy.

If loud, cramped, and impersonal beach bars aren’t your thing, then turn your attention to these low-key drinking establishments where the owners will probably greet you and views are as top-shelf as the cocktails.

Don't plan any vacations before reading this year's Best of Travel winners.

The classic VW camper gets a futuristic upgrade.

In his debut novel, John Vaillant delivers a terrifying border tale

In October, 12 women will compete in one of the world's oldest male-dominated sports. The race? A 38,000-mile monster through pirate-infested waters and rough seas.

Last year in Nazaré, Portugal, the Brazilian surfer nearly drowned while trying to ride the biggest wave ever surfed by a woman. Most of the alpha males who dominate the sport say Gabeira doesn't belong in their ranks, but nothing will stop her from going back in.

For one young chief, protecting his people means embracing ecotourism.

In the three years since the author and her family left Penedo, Brazil, nothing—and everything—changed.

Some plan trips in advance; others let the current carry them. For Amy Ragsdale, traveling with risk takers like herself has helped her trust the process of exploring without a full map, rather than fight it.

With the World Cup underway, the beautiful game is first in hearts and minds. But Brazil has another signature sport: jiu-jitsu. The martial art and self-defense method is based on grappling and ground fighting. It’s a finer art than just choking a dude out. Although hailing from Japan, the Brazilian…

We’ll start by stating the obvious: with the 2014 FIFA World Cup about a week away, now is not really the best time to book your trip to Brazil so you can brag afterward about seeing soccer’s big dance in person. But you already know that—and you…

According to AVP Pro and Olympian April Ross

Ragsdale and her family find that it's impossible not to leave a trace in an isolated Amazonian village—and for the village not to leave something with them.

Grappling with social cues in a foreign country

5 stories by our editors about near-death experiences and how they survived.

I am going to Rio de Janeiro in December and want to get out of the city. I’m looking for must-see excursions that don't involve guided trips or tourist traps. Any ideas for safe places a visitor could comfortably navigate by herself?

Two American climbers started the Centro de Escalada Urbana with a vision: to give kids from one of Rio de Janeiro’s poorest neighborhoods a leg up by teaching them to climb the cliffs near their home. Before they were done, they would blaze new routes up Rio’s granite walls, weather the death of a friend, and see the social order of one of Brazil's biggest slums turned upside down.

The author packed up his house and family and moved to northeastern Brazil for a year. Fantasy or struggle? It’s complicated.

Globe-trotters: we've got you covered. Our 2012 Travel Awards honor the best destinations on seven continents—everything from idyllic beach escapes to camping safaris in Kenya to a mountain-bike expedition in Tibet. Plus: Outside-endorsed outfitters, adventure insurance, and more.

Harold Camping was wrong—twice—about 2011 ushering in the end of days, but the year certainly had its share of environmental catastrophes. Thankfully, there were a few glimmers of hope, as well.

Start off 2012 right, with a trip to one of the world’s wildest destinations

David de Rothschild is paddling Brazil’s Xingu River with a totem pole to stop the proposed Belo Monte dam

South America contains the Amazon, the Andes, 19,000 miles of coastline, and arguably more adventure than any other continent. So where to start? These ten perfect trips, from exploratory rafting in Peru to skiing in Chile to beach-hopping Brazil.

South America contains the Amazon, the Andes, 19,000 miles of coastline, and arguably more adventure than any other continent. So where to start? Try one of these adventure lodges.

Where's best for kayaking or canoeing in Brazil? I like the idea of the Amazon but would also like some beach action. Any tips? -Dave London, England

It's not enough to be at the forefront. In an era when everything has supposedly been done, these adventure icons ignore convention, court risk, and let their passion lead the way.

For years, adventure-travel outfitters have used so-called exploratory trips to work out kinks in new offerings. Veteran guides suss out routes, lodging options, and, say, the local yak-butter tea, then refine the itinerary before it shows up in next fall’s catalog. But as it turns out, some high-end travelers actually…

Expat conservationist John Cain Carter, a former elite Army soldier who did a tour in Iraq, is anything but typical. Same goes for his plan, which calls on ranchers to preserve Brazil's wild west. Can he have it both ways and still save—and survive—the Amazon?

Text The Brazilian Amazon The River of the Dead runs near the Carters’ fishing camp of Rancho Jacobá.The Brazilian Amazon John Carter with a dead jararacucu do brejo snake in the front yard of Fazenda Santo Antonio.The Brazilian Amazon The Kamayurá village consists of a series of traditional thatch-roof huts.The…

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