Brazil


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Into the Deep Unknown ​​​​​​​from research institute Biographic follows deep-sea biologist Diva Amon as she showcases what the earth looks like at 3,280 feet below sea level.

In its quest to make the audience care about leading man Percy Fawcett, the blockbuster gives us a duller, sanitized version of the real-life explorer

A guide to the places where glory will be won—and where the victors will live, sleep, and train

Surfing is rife with stereotypes of laid-back, tanned athletes in tropical locales. But go beyond the surface and you’ll find some of the most interesting subcultures in sport, from bike-and-surf gangs to teenage girls who ride in Bangladesh.

Whirlpools, piranhas, and malaria don’t even make the list

Fulfill that childhood fantasy and book one of these high-end treehouses, from Costa Rica to Italy to San Francisco

From $6-a-night secrets to splurge-worthy resorts (and a few free urban oases), here’s where to escape the grind in a hammock.

Showering outside is one of life’s small pleasures. Discovering there’s one adjoining your hotel room is an enormous joy.

If loud, cramped, and impersonal beach bars aren’t your thing, then turn your attention to these low-key drinking establishments where the owners will probably greet you and views are as top-shelf as the cocktails.

Don't plan any vacations before reading this year's Best of Travel winners.

The classic VW camper gets a futuristic upgrade.

In his debut novel, John Vaillant delivers a terrifying border tale

In October, 12 women will compete in one of the world's oldest male-dominated sports. The race? A 38,000-mile monster through pirate-infested waters and rough seas.

Last year in Nazaré, Portugal, the Brazilian surfer nearly drowned while trying to ride the biggest wave ever surfed by a woman. Most of the alpha males who dominate the sport say Gabeira doesn't belong in their ranks, but nothing will stop her from going back in.

For one young chief, protecting his people means embracing ecotourism.

In the three years since the author and her family left Penedo, Brazil, nothing—and everything—changed.

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