Cycling Deaths


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In the shadow of tragic events like this, can we raise awareness of the dangers cyclists face without scaring people away from bikes? And how do we maintain our own love of cycling?

The pandemic has led to an unexpected positive—people reclaiming streets in ways that have made urban America more bikeable, walkable, and enjoyable. Preserving that will take work, but it’s worth it.

A mountain guide, photographer, and cyclist had a sleepy moment on the road that resulted in her seriously injuring another rider. Here’s what she wants every driver to know.

You're contributing to America's addiction to speeding—and you're much more likely to kill someone

A deeply personal story of one rider’s painful saga—and what we can all learn from it

Rugged, high-clearance, all-wheel-drive vehicles are great for getting out there—but at what cost to cyclists and pedestrians?

I was biking home when you barreled into me with your car and left me to die

Being involved in a crash with a driver while on a bike or on foot is bad enough, but the trouble doesn’t always stop when you get yourself to safety. Navigating the justice and insurance systems afterward can also be an ordeal.

What the media gets wrong, and why, says a lot about how our society views vulnerable road users

Triathlete Adelaide Perr sustained serious injuries after colliding with a car—then was saddled with proving, against the driver’s word, that she was a victim

Last February, 21-year-old Ronnie Ramon Huerta Jr. crashed his Ford 500 sedan into a pack of cyclists during the Palm Springs century. Here’s how the death of one rider, Mark Kristofferson, led to an exceptionally rare murder charge.

Let’s get this straight: if something horrible happens to me on a ride, don’t ever say I died doing what I love. I feel no affection about the idea of getting pulverized by a 4,000-pound SUV, especially if the driver was flipping through Instagram. Still, I recognize that something might happen. And rather than leave it up to other people to commemorate my life and death on the bike, I’ve decided to take matters into my own hands—with facts based on a terrifying encounter with a speeding Porsche that actually happened—just in case the next run-in turns out differently.

It starts with a deadly crash, like the one that happened in October on a busy Orange County street. Then the volunteers build the memorial. Peter Flax embedded with the team that makes ghost bikes in Southern California to record the process—and the tragedy that triggered it—from beginning to end.