Duffle Bag


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Many duffels offer a single cavernous space, but the Big Kit is all about gear-specific organization. It has a separate (and ventilated) shoe compartment, a side panel for a water bottle, a molded pocket for sunglasses or goggles, and a tuck-away helmet carry that lets you attach your lid to…

Ortlieb’s duffle has some details that help it stand out from other similar products on the market. The waterproofing is no joke—zip it up tight and the bag can be submerged for 30 minutes without leaking. The shoulder straps are comfortable enough to let you wear this bag as a…

This 56-liter bag is built from tear-resistant 1,050-denier nylon, and it sheds light rain, thanks to the DWR finish. It has all the duffel features you need—compression straps, lashing straps, and grab handles—and can switch from duffel to backpack with ease. We really dig the daisy-chain-style side panels, which allow…

The 69-liter BAD (Best American Duffel) remains one of our favorite gear haulers. Made with 1,000-denier Cordura nylon and two-inch, 6,000-pound break-strength seat-belt webbing, it’s built to withstand a beating.

The best adventures are too wet, dirty, and cumbersome to contain—unless you've got the right luggage

Base-Camp Duffel: A large, 155-liter bag often seen loaded on yaks in Nepal’s Khumbu region for a few simple reasons: it can take a beating, it has straps that convert it into a backpack, and mountaineers know that it can carry all their gear.

6 packable products for the tiniest of city apartments

Get the most from your time on the water.

A father-son Nashville duo makes this lust-worthy, bombproof bag designed to stop bullets and turn heads.

Bags for light, medium, and heavy packers

You should be packing like a technomad.

We combed through the coolest products at Outdoor Retailer 2014 to bring you these six items—all of which cost $35 or less.

Next week at Outdoor Retailer, Black Diamond will unveil jackets with a revolutionary cord management system that shrinks, hides, and embeds the technology needed to tighten hoods and hems. It’s called Cohaesive, and I’m excited about it for a few reasons. Cohaesive simplifies cord…

Over the past few decades, humans have developed some pretty high-tech synthetic fabrics, including membranes with nine billion pores per square inch and bi-layer wicking polyester.    But in spite of our best efforts, the most advanced technical fibers still come from Mother Nature. Take merino wool, which is hard…

This is always a tricky question. There’s plenty of room for debate when it comes to choosing the “right” ski length, and a useful answer should entail a lot of research.     Take the rocker revolution, which had people arguing about how the effective edge—or the length of metal…

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