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For the German climber and his family, life has changed dramatically over the past five weeks

Mountaineer Irina Galay wants Russian climbers blocked from the high peaks

Whether they want to or not, organizations like World Athletics and the International Olympic Committee have shed the mantle of neutrality

Earlier this year, journalist Amelia Arvesen participated in a ride for bicycling safety that ended in tragedy. Months later, she’s still figuring out how to process what she saw.

Each year an estimated 300,000 smugglers, known as ‘kolbars,’ haul millions of pounds of contraband from Iraq to Iran over the 14,000-foot peaks of the Zagros Mountains. More than 50 of them will die—shot dead, killed in accidents, or freezing to death—and countless more will be arrested and imprisoned. Alex Perry travels to Iraqi Kurdistan to investigate the roots of a trade that all but defies comprehension.

Gage Lorentz was pulled over for speeding on a dirt road in Carlsbad Caverns National Park. Minutes later he lay on the ground, dead from a point-blank shot to the heart. How did a trivial traffic stop lead to his death?

Tourism and marquee events may face a boycott unless the cycling establishment can find an effective way to respond

From the outside, things seemed perfect for the former world extreme skiing champion: he had a family, a successful guiding business, and unending adventure out his front door in Valdez, Alaska. But something dark festered beneath the surface.

Nearly 700 people on bikes have been killed by drivers this year. This is who we lost.

More than 17 years ago, a successful Michigan attorney took his life on a cherished trout stream, devastating close friends and family. Haunted by what happened, his nephew investigated and discovered tragic truths that were in plain sight all along.

My dad is struggling with cancer in North Carolina, and COVID-19 cruelly cut him off from his family. But in Maine, where I live, the pandemic has forced 'Brady Bunch' togetherness that's been challenging, strangely fun, and full of lessons worth carrying forward.

The response to Arbery’s murder highlighted what I already knew: the running world is deeply divided by race, and we must address it

A deeply personal story of one rider’s painful saga—and what we can all learn from it

Rugged, high-clearance, all-wheel-drive vehicles are great for getting out there—but at what cost to cyclists and pedestrians?

I was biking home when you barreled into me with your car and left me to die

Being involved in a crash with a driver while on a bike or on foot is bad enough, but the trouble doesn’t always stop when you get yourself to safety. Navigating the justice and insurance systems afterward can also be an ordeal.

Come work with us!

What the media gets wrong, and why, says a lot about how our society views vulnerable road users

Triathlete Adelaide Perr sustained serious injuries after colliding with a car—then was saddled with proving, against the driver’s word, that she was a victim

Last February, 21-year-old Ronnie Ramon Huerta Jr. crashed his Ford 500 sedan into a pack of cyclists during the Palm Springs century. Here’s how the death of one rider, Mark Kristofferson, led to an exceptionally rare murder charge.

Let’s get this straight: if something horrible happens to me on a ride, don’t ever say I died doing what I love. I feel no affection about the idea of getting pulverized by a 4,000-pound SUV, especially if the driver was flipping through Instagram. Still, I recognize that something might happen. And rather than leave it up to other people to commemorate my life and death on the bike, I’ve decided to take matters into my own hands—with facts based on a terrifying encounter with a speeding Porsche that actually happened—just in case the next run-in turns out differently.

It starts with a deadly crash, like the one that happened in October on a busy Orange County street. Then the volunteers build the memorial. Peter Flax embedded with the team that makes ghost bikes in Southern California to record the process—and the tragedy that triggered it—from beginning to end.