Freediving


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Two new releases go (ahem) deep on watery obsessions and how they foster closer relationships with fragile environments

The third annual International World Extreme Sports Medicine Congress confirmed our collective willingness to wreck ourselves in pursuit of stoke

Off the coast of Baja lies an oasis of spearfishing opportunities. For professional spearfisherman Pete Correale, this means he can satisfy his itch to be in the ocean every day.

The world likes to tell us what we can’t do. For Kimi Werner—spearfisher, freediver, shark whisperer, chef, artist, and entrepreneur—the key to a badass life was learning to listen to a different voice: her own.

Keenan was a legend in the sport—and is the first rescue diver to die while freediving

Jesper Stechmann is a World Champion Freediver who was raised in Denmark. From the ripe age of six years old, he began holding his breath under water and since then, he's lived much of his life under the surface of the water.

After years of diving competitively, Francisco Del Rosario realized that it had distracted him from the foundations of the sport: clarity of mind, the inexplicable sensations, and to visit another world beneath the waves.

After a knee injury, Johanna Nordblad took to the icy waters of Finland to heal her knee.

Want to learn a new skill and visit a faraway locale? You can now do both, thanks to a boom in instructional outdoor clinics worth traveling for.

It depends—but you can hold your breath longer in cold water

The freediving world championships occur at the outer limits of competitive risk. ­During the 2011 event, held off the coast of Greece, more than 130 athletes assembled to swim hundreds of feet straight down on a single breath—without (they hoped) ­passing out, freaking out, or drowning. Meet the amazingly fit, unquestionably brave, and possibly crazy people who line up for the ultimate plunge.