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Leaf peeping in New England. Surfing California’s coast. Cruising Alaska’s Inside Passage (yes, Alaska, in fall). We scoured the world to find the absolute best destinations to satisfy your autumn wanderlust—especially this year, when we all have a little cabin fever.

Leaf peeping in Colorado. Surfing the Azores. Cruising Alaska’s Inside Passage—yes, Alaska, in fall. We scoured the world to find epic adventures and stunning destinations to satisfy your autumn wanderlust, especially this year, when we all have a little cabin fever.

A hard carrying case is being issued to solve potential issues with DSP beacons switching modes accidentally

A massive storm led to a record-breaking 60-hour shutdown at Utah’s Little Cottonwood Canyon last weekend, followed by a day of private skiing exclusively for those already in the area

Last year, the American Ornithological Society accepted a proposal to rename a bird linked to a racist figure. And there's more where that came from.

Our advice on which park to visit each month of the year to see peak wildlife, foliage, and flower blooms—and to avoid the crowds

Our seven picks for cross-country-skiing trail networks that make for perfect, crowd-free winter outings

Are electric vehicles ready for the open road and the backcountry?

These eight rentals are the ultimate social-distancing hacks

Thru-hiker traffic on this western trail is growing faster than the volunteer community's ability to handle it

Gina Rae La Cerva's 'Feasting Wild' is a delightful culinary travel book. It's also an adjustment to the way we think about what that buzzword actually means

Go to this massive California destination for the hiking, but stay for its spectacularly colorful early mornings. It's our 62 Parks Traveler's third stop on her journey to visit every U.S. national park in a year.

After 30 years, Ktunaxa First Nation, with help from the Canadian government and Patagonia, finally shut down the Jumbo Glacier ski-resort development

We talked to the experts about everything from surface stability to parking to find the most epic trails in the U.S.

Hotel Rodavento in Valle de Bravo, Mexico, serves up an entrancing mix of downtime and adrenaline

Why companies as diverse as Patagonia and General Mills are suddenly focused on getting dirty

From where to go to what to pack, here's everything a newbie needs to know to pull off a successful first hut trip

A few tips to help you incorporate this​ lifelong hobby in​to your everyday excursions

Snag some major airfare discounts on your next trip

With ten ski areas less than an hour from Salt Lake City's airport, and incredible backcountry terrain, powder-blessed Utah is arguably the best ski destination in North America. Here's our primer on how to make the most of it.

Alaska Airlines's latest flight promotion to Hawaii offers cheaper tickets for bigger waves—but you only have a few days to snag a deal

Catch the great southerly migration with North America's top birding enthusiasts

'Thru' is an upcoming documentary about thru-hiking and why it's such a painfully enjoyable activity

After an especially brutal winter in Colorado, Independence Pass needs a team of seven heavy-equipment operators, an avalanche forecaster, and a surveillance crew to make the road passable

Hoffmeister is no stranger to long kayak trips—she's already paddled around Ireland, Australia, and South America

From Yosemite to the Green Mountains, these are our favorite lodge-to-lodge treks this side of the pond

The Points Guy is hooking up one fortunate traveler with $13,000 worth of airline points

After decades of film skiing, he caught the ski mountaineering bug

Yet it—along with its meteorologists—is struggling through the shutdown

This lavish mountain hut in the heart of Denali National Park may be perched on a razor’s edge, but its real thrill is access to endless adventure

A few years ago, more than 60 percent of the country fell under some level of drought. The worst thing? These warm, dry conditions tend to lead to even warmer, drier ones.

There really is a massive difference between weather alerts depending on where they're issued. The question is: Can you handle the heat?

Catch this summer's night sky in full force in one of these perfectly dark locales

The outdoor community made filtration a must for a reason

More than any other animal, ducks depend on hunting to survive

In 1905, Mina Hubbard completed the expedition that had killed her husband—and beat the pants off his swaggering rival

Presenting the best burgs on the planet

Growing research debunks the myth that the paleo movement replicates the diet of our ancestors. Here's what they were actually eating.

A new bike rack promises to make schlepping two-wheeled rigs as easy as carrying skis

For the last 30 years, American Rivers, a nonprofit advocacy group out of Washington, D.C., has been calling attention the plight of the country’s rivers. Today, the group released its annual Most Endangered Rivers report, a catalogue of the ten rivers in America most threatened in 2017.

Almost 50 years ago, Richard Nixon commissioned a photography project called Documerica to illustrate miles and miles of environmental degradation, advocating for the need for the agency. The following are some of the most striking images from that project.

Admirality Island has more brown bears than the entire lower 48 combined

When photographer Ryann Ford moved to Texas in 2007, she began driving across the state, accepting photography assignments in every corner. Ford would take the quickest, main highways on her way there and look for the more scenic routes on the way back.

Photographer Lucas Foglia’s widely celebrated book, Frontcountry, took him across much of the American West from 2006 to 2013. He captured nearly 60,000 images over that time and narrowed the final selection down to just 60 shots, all of which explored mining and ranching communities and their interaction with the surrounding landscape. Despite his extensive coverage, Foglia thinks many of the stories he came across are still undercovered. He even included a map in the book as an invitation for other photographers and storytellers to use as a resource. Here, Foglia highlights a few storylines from his book that are far from over.

You can’t drive to these backcountry lodges. This is a feature in our book, not a drawback.

The Director of Programs at the Natural Resources Defense Council on the fights she faces in 2015, and how to get involved.

Stuck in an airport during the wee hours? Author Bruce Northam, who’s been traveling the globe for the last three decades, explains what to do when a terminal becomes your one-night stand.

Can't get to the slopes yourself? There's a virtual reality goggle for that.

A nonprofit aims to publicize never-before-seen footage of marine life in its natural, undisturbed habitat. The goal? Develop the ultimate marine observation tool.

Think feeling crappy on a plane is inevitable? Think again. What you eat pre-flight could mean the difference between winning your away race and spending the trip in bed nursing NyQuil.

With airlines packing more people than ever into their planes, how can I make the most of my limited space?

Bob Windsor keeps Churchill, Manitoba, free of a different kind of perp

There are plenty of ski areas where you can show up without a map and dink around on mellow (read: boring) terrain all day. These aren’t those kind of resorts.

Where deep powder meets uncrowded runs

Five mountain towns where the skiing and riding are matched by equally entertaining off-the-slopes escapades.

Looking for the funnest terrain in North America? Go here.

When a craft-beer brewery starts making hand-made mountain bikes and putting them on a kickass North Carolina ranch, happiness is only a singletrack ride away.

A few weeks ago, when Vail Resorts bought Park City Mountain Resort, the sale triggered an onslaught of vitriol against Colorado's billion-dollar ski empire. But while it's easy to hate a company just because it's claiming territory faster than the whitebark pine beetle, Vail has actually been a very good thing for skiers.

What happens when you take away the road, the cheerful volunteers handing out energy gels, and most of your sanity? You get some of the gnarliest races out there.

Plus a few other excellent things I learned at FUZE SW, a food conference you do not want to miss.

Explorer Daniel Fox has paddled some of the world's wildest places in search of images that can reconnect us with nature—but not humanize it. His startling Wild Image Project brings wildlife up close and personal, asking viewers to reconsider their relationship with the environment. "Nature is raw, rough, cruel, pretty, beautiful, inspiring, but above all, a humble experience," Fox says. And that's a great thing.

I'd love to haul my kids up the railings to Half Dome, but don't want to risk accidents—or turning them off of hiking forever. How can we have fun while staying safe in the national park?

Anxiety, depression, obesity—kids are increasingly becoming unhappy and unhealthy. But there is a pill-free solution: outdoor play.

The gentrification of cheap beer continues.

National park concessions are moving toward more sustainable foods, and that means tastier, greener meals for you.

North Carolina State University wants to sell off Hofmann Forest for $150 million. Is that such a bad thing?

One man and his canine pal cover 13,000 miles in 32 states to discover just how strong our relationship is with man's best friend.

The 5 best ways to paddle, eat, and sail your way through "Vacationland" this summer

Surf icon Dave Kalama is still winning a year shy of his 50th birthday. But he has new competition: Kai Lenny, the 21-year-old rising star. What happens when the prodigy faces the man who taught him almost everything he knows about paddleboarding?

To win this year’s Tour Divide, Jefe Branham rode 170 miles a day, slept an average of four hours a night, and endured both unrelenting snow and 100-degree heat for 16 days straight. What you can learn from his time in the pain cave.

It’s such a culinary contradiction: the great gourmet food of New England is usually served on paper plates and eaten at picnic tables by grownups wearing plastic bibs. Yet there’s no denying that the tastiest lobster served in Maine invariably comes from laid back hole-in-the-wall food shacks that line the…

Play outside with kids your own age

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