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The National Park Service hasn’t had a director in four years. The Biden administration is trying to fix that but faces a host of major challenges.

Writer Jason Motlagh has been reporting in Afghanistan since 2006, which has involved developing close relationships with Afghan journalists and their families. He and a network of media colleagues are currently in a race to get more than 100 of them out of the country as the Taliban cracks down.

As the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report made clear this week, we’re going to need to give up some of the things we love if we don’t want much more taken away

Democrats in Congress are pushing for a federal jobs program that would tackle climate, land use, infrastructure, and more. Here’s why it’s so urgent.

Despite GOP rhetoric, selling America’s largest rainforest to China was actually bad business

History tells us why skiing—and the outdoors in general—lacks diversity. Thanks to the work of dedicated groups, this is slowly changing.

In ‘Camping Grounds,’ Phoebe S.K. Young reminds us that sleeping outdoors is far more than just a recreational hobby

Competence wins, as Biden’s Interior Secretary acts to protect America’s last great wilderness

Here’s how President Biden plans to address climate change, pollution, and public lands in the greatest detail we’ve seen so far

One editor’s thoughts on the Asian American illusion of belonging

The state just passed a law calling for 90 percent of its wolf population to be killed. It’s based on fear and lies.

‘Head on a Swivel’ shows how running as a person of color can be an act of defiance

The 46th president made big promises to move the United States toward a carbon-free future. What he’s accomplished so far has been impressive, but can he keep up the momentum?

Gage Lorentz was pulled over for speeding on a dirt road in Carlsbad Caverns National Park. Minutes later he lay on the ground, dead from a point-blank shot to the heart. How did a trivial traffic stop lead to his death?

In Ours, a digital exhibition for the New Museum, artist Samuel Marion imagines a not too distant future in which outdoor brands use slick advertising to mask more sinister aims

With the stroke of a pen, the secretary of the interior just undid most of Trump’s harmful energy policies

In his new book, ‘The Nation of Plants,’ botanist Stefano Mancuso suggests that human democracies may have something to learn from the world’s trees and flowers

CEO Ryan Gellert says staying silent is “tantamount to supporting unjust laws”

Republican senators used the hearing to air conspiracy theories, lie, and point fingers at Biden nominee for issues they themselves are responsible for

The billionaire philanthropist has thrown his wealth at some of the world’s most intractable problems, drawing both praise and criticism along the way. His approach to tackling the climate crisis is no different.

Right-wing politicians and media are trying to scapegoat frozen wind turbines for the state’s power disaster. Their claims couldn’t be more inaccurate and irresponsible.

Despite rhetoric from Republicans, the shift toward renewable energy actually brings substantial, nationwide economic benefits—and it'll help the oil and gas industry, too

From day one, the new administration has showed itself to be in favor of protecting the wild spaces and species we love

In one fell swoop, President Biden is undoing his predecessor's most harmful work on public lands, climate change, clean air and water, and environmental justice

The end of the Trump administration can't come soon enough for our climate and public lands. Thankfully, there are a series of actions our new president can immediately take to begin undoing the damage.

Drawing only three bidders and $14 million, the administration's attempt to drill for oil in the massive Alaskan refuge is likely dead on arrival

The 35th generation New Mexican will oversee public lands, national parks, Native American affairs, and more

Can the IOC create an internationally applicable code of conduct for Olympic protest?

A quarantine backyard ultramarathon. Thousands of protesters on bikes. This year brought the unexpected in countless forms. Here’s who (and what) had the biggest impact on the outdoor world.

With a key list of Land and Water Conservation Fund projects missing, political subterfuge threatens the bipartisan legislative achievement

Today’s battles over climate change and fracking share a common origin: the timber wars of the Pacific Northwest

The marine biologist has become a leading voice in the movement by deftly communicating what few people understand: that cleaning up the planet requires a commitment to social justice

A lesson for the Department of the Interior staff: you can’t delete official tweets

Taking care of our planet shouldn't be a partisan issue. These activist-athletes think the flag might help bridge the divide.

Jeremy Jones, the king of freeriding, wants to unleash the political might of the 50 million Americans who love our natural playgrounds

“America’s Amazon” is being sold to China, at a huge cost to the environment, and a net loss to taxpayers

Even in traditionally conservative states like Montana and Wyoming, no single issue unites centrist voters in 2020 more than public-lands protection. That's one reason Montana Republican senator Steve Daines has spent the past 18 months trying to convince voters he's a reliable conservationist. Critics say it's mere "greenwashing," but his success may decide the balance of power in Washington.

It was a roller coaster of a summer for Alaska's most controversial extraction project. In July, it looked all but certain that the salmon-threatening proposal would get its first federal permit. But then things took a surprising turn.

Carbon offsets are confusing, and many people wonder how—or if—they even work. Hoping to find a more guilt-free way to travel, frequent flier Tim Neville heads to the ranchlands of Montana to see what an offset looks like on the ground. Hint: it involves cows.

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