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A new twist in the old debate about caffeine's performance-enhancing powers suggests it helps maintain oxygen levels in the blood

Spoiler alert: It’s not because you’re a wuss.

Women are said to be 10 to 12 percent slower than men across distances, but a new analysis finds narrower gaps for sprinters

If you want workers to come back to the office, here's a thought: let them wear shorts

There’s encouraging new evidence on artery stiffening and the risks of too much exercise

A new study aims to resolve long-standing debates about how much drafting helps runners, and finds that even back-of-the-packers save meaningful time

Mounting evidence suggests that women respond differently to endurance training after menopause. Could donating blood be the solution?

A deep dive into the sports science literature shows why you should be wary of results that seem too good to be true

A small Minnesota company believes it has developed the future of fitness tech. Now it has to teach the rest of us how to use it.

‘Fire of Love’ uses the archival footage from Katia and Maurice Krafft to tell the story of how they fell in love and pushed the boundaries of science and adventure

People develop sensitivities to just about everything these days, but can you really be allergic to frigid temperatures? Our writer takes us on a wild—and potentially life threatening—journey to find out.

A new study assesses how childbirth altered the career trajectories of the fastest marathoners in history, with encouraging results

New research explores whether the performance-boosting effects of positive self-talk can be attributed to more than just the absence of negativity

A team of Canadian Olympic sports psychologists tries to nail down the intangible “it”

A new study compares active and passive interval recoveries, but physiology isn’t the only factor to consider

The algorithms used to estimate your training load have some fundamental flaws, scientists say

Most people run the same pace regardless of how far they’re running, according to new research

He was an environmentalist versed in the dangers of our warming world, an expert trail runner, and eminently capable of moving far and fast outside. The heat killed him all the same.

Our furry friends are the best of adventure playmates. But they can also provide pure, unconditional love that gets us through the darkest times.

How well you can see your surroundings matters, but subtle gait changes also burn more energy

Surf companies have been ignoring compelling research that could make wetsuits warmer and easier to paddle in. Two scientists are making sure someone listens.

Like the two-hour marathon chase, next month’s assault on the seven- and eight-hour Ironman barriers will require some rule-bending

Mother Nature’s most bizarre wonders are created by all-real natural effects

There’s a distinct pleasure to eating wild foods that you forage yourself—unless you pick the wrong thing

Want to grow your own food but don’t know where to start? Plant a few of these and you’ll have a full pantry in no time.

Runners smack the ground harder—but get injured less—in more cushioned shoes. New research explains why.

In forests across the planet, secretive hunters are searching for that rare and insanely expensive wild delicacy: the truffle.

Five scientifically proven ways to up the fun in your life

Scientists studying mice found that their competitive efforts depended on their social ranking rather than their strength or speed

To become one of those people who joyfully hikes, bikes, and skis in the nude, she’d have to train for it

An analysis of power data from pro cyclists quantifies the effects of hot and cold air temperatures on performance

The City of Angels is bringing together tech, academia, government, nonprofits, and ordinary residents to make its greenery more equitable and mitigate the effects of both climate change and systemic racism

When we open our ears to the marvels of natural soundscapes, we experience the energies of the world in a unique way—and begin to understand the mysteries behind them

You can’t run fast without using your arms—or can you?

Our best advice for growing your own food and foliage

Take your gardening indoors with houseplants. Use these tips to place them in proper sunlight, water them correctly, and feed them so they survive and thrive.

A relationship with plants built on love, care, and respect is at the heart of bringing the outdoors inside

The best way to catch aurora borealis in all its lit-up beauty: go to the darkest places on earth, at just the right time, and hope for the best

You need more natural silence in your life. Find it in these parks.

Despite years of research, the athletic potential of Montmorency cherries isn’t as sweet as it sounds

Your unexplained fatigue may be due to calorie deficiency, with serious implications for your health and performance

It’s not easy being a progressive who works for a middle-of-the-road president. Mark Sundeen sizes up the interior secretary’s first year in office—which has been a disappointment to climate-change activists—and decides she’s most likely to make a mark through a historic reckoning over the U.S. government’s shameful running of Native American boarding schools.

An analysis of pro cycling data finds that altitude-born South American riders race better at high altitudes than their lowland-born rivals

The oral health risks associated with heavy sports-drink use seem clear, but the evidence remains murky

What motivates someone to run more than 3,000 miles around a block in Queens, New York? Transcendence.

The team behind the shipwreck’s discovery sought more than just a shipwreck

New findings suggest that results from large training studies can’t be generalized to individuals

Joey Santore is a tattooed ex-punk who is self-taught in the sciences. Which might explain why he’s getting so many people to care about plants.

Joey Santore’s YouTube channel, Crime Pays but Botany Doesn’t, crosses citizen science with vigilante environmentalism

A new study of identical twins shows that, despite their reputation as inert rubber bands, Achilles tendons adapt to exercise

Most studies on sports performance don’t include women. The team behind Stanford’s FASTR program is creating a new approach—and building a healthier culture for female athletes. 

Science shows that spending time outdoors can help with all kinds of serious ailments. So why not a broken heart?

New research explores how physical and mental factors affect how athletes raise their game when it counts

Freezing to death. Heatstroke. The excruciatingly painful sting of a box jellyfish, which can kill a person in under a minute. After writing the classic 1997 story “Frozen Alive,” Peter Stark became an expert on what it feels like to die in the wild. We asked him why people are so interested in reading about it—and about his own close calls.

A popular training rule for endurance athletes faces scrutiny from skeptical scientists

An experienced physician and marathoner answers questions you’re embarrassed to ask about running and sex

Work less, adventure more, and get some rest

In the past two years, Americans have become disenchanted with work, leading to major strikes and what is being called the Great Resignation. But what if there was a better way? This writer went looking for that ever elusive work-life balance, learning how to get outside more and stress less.

A new study grapples with a familiar question: How much of athletic success is physical, and how much is mental?

When Outside contributing editor Florence Williams’s husband of 25 years left her, she paddled the Green River to process her grief. Her new book recounts that story and dives into the science of the heart.

We tend to assume that a nice-looking stride is a fast one, but maybe looking good is its own reward

The Twitter famous saurologist and cofounder of Black AF in STEM is helping to build a more inclusive scientific community—and spotting some very sneaky lizards along the way

Scientists have figured out how to make simple exoskeletons that improve running efficiency. Should track and field authorities be worried?

Different workout styles can get you equally fit, but they affect your body differently—which suggests that you should mix it up

All over America’s ancient eastern mountains, there’s an organism that lives underground, tethered to tree roots, waiting to be hunted. It’s among the world’s rarest and most expensive foods, and it grows in a wide range of conditions. But there’s only one guy in the country who really knows how to find it. Rowan Jacobsen joins him in the search for the Appalachian truffle.

Three methods to cultivate pacing mastery and optimize your performance potential

A new way of classifying athletes aims to quantify the thresholds that distinguish recreational athletes from their trained, highly trained, and elite brethren

Our Sweat Science columnist spent two months measuring his blood sugar around the clock. Here’s what he found.

The latest “exercise in a bottle” study finds that plasma from exercising mice makes sedentary mice smarter. But don’t throw out your workout gear just yet.

Athletes like Mikaela Shiffrin have started adopting the training technique to increase endurance, muscle mass, and more

Over the past decade, research into compression sportswear has exploded. Here’s what the results reveal.

With increased coastal flooding and erosion, climate change is harshing California’s mellow vibes. Officials say it’s time to retreat from the shore altogether. Residents want to stay and fight. Paul Kvinta reports from the front lines of a pitched battle, where geologists and millionaires are squaring off, and friendly fire between surfers isn’t so friendly.

It’s time to break out the merino base layers and the heat-exchange breathing masks

When someone gets hurt in the wild, we know what to do. But what we’ve lacked for way too long are the tools to help people in severe mental distress.

The genes that make some people vulnerable to a fatal heart stoppage may be the same ones that give them an athletic edge, researchers suggest

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