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Army researchers assess the evidence on what makes you stronger, and speculate about new approaches that might work even better

Healthy habits are hard to maintain. We sent five writers on long-overdue quests for self-improvement.

After years of infinite scrolling, it was time for a drastic intervention

Believe it or not, talking to new people won’t kill you

Figuring out how to get better sleep and more excise and is hard—which is why we tried out some new programs for you

And what does Damar Hamlin’s cardiac arrest tell us about the risks sports pose to an athlete’s heart?

A head-to-head lab showdown finds that power and efficiency depend on your preferred running surface

From the whimsical to the epic, these are our favorite stories of the year

Cautionary tales from the official journal of the Wilderness Medical Society

Moving from long to short efforts during a workout maximizes the training stimulus

A selection of recent titles to keep you warm by the fire 

The shredders, climbers, policy-makers, barrier breakers, and scientists who forever changed the way we view the world

The group of scientists and adventurers gained valuable knowledge about climate change’s impact on ice in the Weddell Sea, and did additional research on weather, navigation, and marine engineering

The downside of veggies, the upside of emptying your colon, and more

New research finds that, all else being equal, runners don’t have more gastrointestinal problems than cyclists

New research explores the differences between active and inactive twins, and why such pairs are so rare

Replacing lost salt is a pillar of sports nutrition, but new research suggests more isn’t always better

Researchers in Japan try to figure out which miles matter most for long-distance runners

Elite running coaches weigh in on what it means to be talented and how they predict who will run fastest

The acclaimed science writer answered audience questions about reporting on the race to understand the SARS-CoV-2 and how the COVID-19 pandemic began

A pair of experiments find that mice choose to run less after taking antibiotics, even though their endurance is unchanged

The acclaimed nonfiction writer talked to nearly 100 scientists to tell the story of how the virus that caused COVID-19 spilled over into humans and spread across the globe

New data shows that, unlike a car, you can’t perform well with a half-full fuel tank

Join us for a live Zoom Q and A with the acclaimed science writer and longtime Outside contributing editor, who will discuss his new book about the SARS-CoV-2 virus on Thursday, October 13

New data outlines how much they run, how long it takes to resume training after giving birth, and how well they return to competition

The unending search for a competitive edge in sports has a cost. It’s called the Red Queen effect.

Runners make bigger improvements following a flexible workout schedule rather than sticking with a predetermined one

A new twist in the old debate about caffeine's performance-enhancing powers suggests it helps maintain oxygen levels in the blood

Spoiler alert: It’s not because you’re a wuss.

Women are said to be 10 to 12 percent slower than men across distances, but a new analysis finds narrower gaps for sprinters

If you want workers to come back to the office, here's a thought: let them wear shorts

There’s encouraging new evidence on artery stiffening and the risks of too much exercise

A new study aims to resolve long-standing debates about how much drafting helps runners, and finds that even back-of-the-packers save meaningful time

Mounting evidence suggests that women respond differently to endurance training after menopause. Could donating blood be the solution?

A deep dive into the sports science literature shows why you should be wary of results that seem too good to be true

A small Minnesota company believes it has developed the future of fitness tech. Now it has to teach the rest of us how to use it.

‘Fire of Love’ uses the archival footage from Katia and Maurice Krafft to tell the story of how they fell in love and pushed the boundaries of science and adventure

People develop sensitivities to just about everything these days, but can you really be allergic to frigid temperatures? Our writer takes us on a wild—and potentially life threatening—journey to find out.

A new study assesses how childbirth altered the career trajectories of the fastest marathoners in history, with encouraging results

New research explores whether the performance-boosting effects of positive self-talk can be attributed to more than just the absence of negativity

A team of Canadian Olympic sports psychologists tries to nail down the intangible “it”

A new study compares active and passive interval recoveries, but physiology isn’t the only factor to consider

The algorithms used to estimate your training load have some fundamental flaws, scientists say

Most people run the same pace regardless of how far they’re running, according to new research

He was an environmentalist versed in the dangers of our warming world, an expert trail runner, and eminently capable of moving far and fast outside. The heat killed him all the same.

Our furry friends are the best of adventure playmates. But they can also provide pure, unconditional love that gets us through the darkest times.

How well you can see your surroundings matters, but subtle gait changes also burn more energy

Surf companies have been ignoring compelling research that could make wetsuits warmer and easier to paddle in. Two scientists are making sure someone listens.

Like the two-hour marathon chase, next month’s assault on the seven- and eight-hour Ironman barriers will require some rule-bending

Mother Nature’s most bizarre wonders are created by all-real natural effects

There’s a distinct pleasure to eating wild foods that you forage yourself—unless you pick the wrong thing

Want to grow your own food but don’t know where to start? Plant a few of these and you’ll have a full pantry in no time.

Runners smack the ground harder—but get injured less—in more cushioned shoes. New research explains why.

In forests across the planet, secretive hunters are searching for that rare and insanely expensive wild delicacy: the truffle.

Five scientifically proven ways to up the fun in your life

Scientists studying mice found that their competitive efforts depended on their social ranking rather than their strength or speed

To become one of those people who joyfully hikes, bikes, and skis in the nude, she’d have to train for it

An analysis of power data from pro cyclists quantifies the effects of hot and cold air temperatures on performance

The City of Angels is bringing together tech, academia, government, nonprofits, and ordinary residents to make its greenery more equitable and mitigate the effects of both climate change and systemic racism

When we open our ears to the marvels of natural soundscapes, we experience the energies of the world in a unique way—and begin to understand the mysteries behind them

You can’t run fast without using your arms—or can you?

Our best advice for growing your own food and foliage

Take your gardening indoors with houseplants. Use these tips to place them in proper sunlight, water them correctly, and feed them so they survive and thrive.

A relationship with plants built on love, care, and respect is at the heart of bringing the outdoors inside

The best way to catch aurora borealis in all its lit-up beauty: go to the darkest places on earth, at just the right time, and hope for the best

You need more natural silence in your life. Find it in these parks.

Despite years of research, the athletic potential of Montmorency cherries isn’t as sweet as it sounds

Your unexplained fatigue may be due to calorie deficiency, with serious implications for your health and performance

It’s not easy being a progressive who works for a middle-of-the-road president. Mark Sundeen sizes up the interior secretary’s first year in office—which has been a disappointment to climate-change activists—and decides she’s most likely to make a mark through a historic reckoning over the U.S. government’s shameful running of Native American boarding schools.

An analysis of pro cycling data finds that altitude-born South American riders race better at high altitudes than their lowland-born rivals

The oral health risks associated with heavy sports-drink use seem clear, but the evidence remains murky

What motivates someone to run more than 3,000 miles around a block in Queens, New York? Transcendence.

The team behind the shipwreck’s discovery sought more than just a shipwreck

New findings suggest that results from large training studies can’t be generalized to individuals

Joey Santore is a tattooed ex-punk who is self-taught in the sciences. Which might explain why he’s getting so many people to care about plants.

Joey Santore’s YouTube channel, Crime Pays but Botany Doesn’t, crosses citizen science with vigilante environmentalism

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