Snow Sports

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Outside Magazine, 1999 Annual Travel Guide Don’t Be a Lard Puppy* *N: an out-of-shape, weekend leisure rider By Lisa Twyman Bessone Whitewater Kayaking The School: Sundance Kayak School and Expeditions, Merlin, Oregon The Drill: In the wilderness alongside…

Outside magazine, June 1994 Expeditions: More Daunting than Everest, More Technical than a Yosemite Wall With increasing regulation looming, climbers scramble to negotiate with the federal government By Douglas Gantenbein They could never do this with backpackers or handicapped people,” snarls…

Outside magazine, March 1999 Review: Just as Tough as They Look Beefy leather hiking boots to last you a lifetime By Kent Black ELECTRONICS | BUYING RIGHT |…

 Outside magazine, February 1999 Cross-Country Ski Your Way to Shining Health, Renewed Vigor, and Everlasting Happiness! Life got you down? Feeling morose, slaggardly, low on essence? Ah, dear friend, you need the curative powers contained within a…

Outside magazine, June 1994 Fine In-Line Skates Roll with high quality, not just high technology By Jim Harmon Buy right or buy twice–a lesson that in-line skaters have lots of opportunities to learn the hard way. Try to save some money…

Outside’s Annual Travel Guide, 1999/2000 Page: 1 | 2 LET’S SKI A DEAL: DOING THE BOBFEST On January 20, 2000, the overcaffeinated, underfed independent moviemaking world will descend on Park City, Utah, for the start…

 Outside magazine, February 1998 Winter Olympics Preview: Nagano? Naga-Yes! Sure, this year’s Winter Olympics will have its foibles, including a gaggle of over-hyped personal stories, suspense-killing tape-delays, and TV talking heads nattering on about “adorable” pixies on skates. But that doesn’t mean…

 Outside magazine, June 1996 Balloonatics They’re swashbuckling billionaires and absent-minded dreamers, all chasing one of the last great adventures: 25,000 miles around the globe by jet stream and Icarian wing. No stopping, no sploshing. By Daniel…

 Outside magazine, March 1995 Surge Time at the Bottom of the Earth Chasing deep history in Antarctica, Genesis in reverse By Edward Hoagland As our stubby, white, 2,000-ton ship, the Professor Molchanov, passed the Gibraltarlike bulk of Cape Horn, the…

Outside magazine, January 1994 Expeditions: Fly the Unhinged Skies Off on a “crazy” hopscotch of the Andes, it’s Didier Favre, sky pilot By Brad Wetzler “‘Crazy’ is better than ‘insane,'” says Swiss hang glider Didier Favre in his hyperactive French accent.

Dispatches, February 1998 EXPEDITIONS Gramps Is Doing What? Vaughan, 92-year-old spring chicken, mushes through another Alaskan winter By Bill Donahue It’s not exactly the remark you expect to hear from a guy who’s about to hop on a dogsled…

Outside magazine, April 1995 Snowboarding: This Isn’t Baseball By Todd Balf With two rival race circuits splitting up the best international talent, several American riders, led by former world champion Mike Jacoby, were happy to devour the inaugural Grundig Snowboard World Cup tour, put…

Shwoosh! All You Need is Dirt The Hysterical Parent A medical emergency You would be a fool to venture into the wilderness without someone in your party being certified in first aid. Call your pediatrician or hospital for information…

Outside magazine, Travel Guide 1997-1998 Hut, Two, Three, Four… Bunk to bunk on backcountry skis By Lisa Jones EXTREME MEASURES | BUNK TO BUNK | DETAILS | THE…

 Outside magazine, October 1997 Roof of the World, Center of a Universe Jostling between the spiritual and the secular in Kathmandu, once and future base camp for all manner of quests By Bob Shacochis “And the wildest dreams…

Traveler’s Almanac, 1999 Annual Travel Guide Deals Frequent Freebies Skiing your brains out has its rewards By Peter Oliver Skiing is going corporate. In the past three years, large conglomerates have been swallowing up independent resorts at a dizzying…

Outside Magazine, 1999 Annual Travel Guide Holidays on Ice Skate and glide your way through the season at five snowbound lodges Mirror Lake Inn, New York Walk into Lake Placid’s Mirror Lake Inn, and it’s possible for all of your lofty…

Outside magazine, Travel Guide 1997-1998 Bored? Board! The time has come to ride wide By Rob Story BORED? BOARD! | DETAILS, DETAILS | GEARING UP | ESSENTIAL GEAR…

Outside magazine, Travel Guide 1997-1998 Sea Kayaking LONG CAYE, BELIZE There’s a certain queasy feeling that comes from bobbing up and down in three-foot swells while ensconced in a slightly wobbly sea kayak. It’s not quite seasickness, but it’s close enough to…

Out Front, Fall 1998 Mountaineering Whither the Big One? Climbing Everest can be a ho-hum affair — unless, that is, you have a gimmick By Mike Grudowski There was a time — 23 years ago, to be precise —…

 Outside magazine, May 1997 Everest a Year Later: False Summit After a lifetime of wanting, Jon Krakauer made it to the world’s highest point. What he and the other survivors would discover in the months to come, however, is that it’s even…

Outside magazine, January 1994 Skiing: Dynamite Powder By Michael Kiefer In southern Oregon’s Cascade Range, powder is not the dry and feathery stuff that floats down over Utah. Here, it’s a bit wetter, a bit heavier. It makes you work harder. And on…

Winter Olympics Preview, February 1998 THE DREAMER My Snakebit Career The Hard Luck Kid of skiing takes another — and perhaps a final — run at the glory that’s long eluded him By Craig Vetter THE DOPE ON…

Outside magazine, April 1995 Ice Skating: Trash-Talkin’ Canucks By Todd Balf From Les Arcs, France, to Montreal, Canada, mild winter weather in December and January disrupted almost anything requiring the cold white stuff. The biennial world championships of alpine skiing, scheduled for Sierra Nevada,…

Outside magazine, April 1998 Field Notes: 50 CC of Pampering for the Skier-Stump, Stat! A peek under the rug of Aspen’s ER, where Very Important Ligaments come to be healed By Florence Williams You want Chris Martinez to be…

Outside magazine, July 1995 Burlington, Vermont A town where you can have a real job, a real life, and still get to move in with the scenery. Several reasons to split the city and head for the Big Outdoors. By Mike Steere…

Out Front, October 1997 Attention: the Editors Have Left the Building Celebrating two decades of accuracy, prescience, and gentility. Or something like that. By Adam Horowitz If only we could attribute it to a newborn keeping us up all night.

Outside magazine, September 1995 Blazes of Glory By Larry Burke Smokejumpers are a rare breed of professionals, experiencing daily trials and tribulations–not to mention a proximity to nature’s primeval forces–that would make most of us blanch. Every summer, armed with little more than parachutes…

Outside magazine, January 1996 Skiing: Outta My Way, Girlfriend! Hilary Lindh is the most successful woman downhiller in U.S. history. So why is she trying so hard to play catch-up with Picabo? By Hal Clifford “I always wind up looking like a…

Outside magazine, January 1998 Review The Other Stuff Leedom Limit Snowboard Helmet THE STREAMLINED HOME GYM | ESSENTIALS | THE OTHER STUFF | BOOKS Leedom…

Outside magazine, November 1995 Postnuptial Agreements Four resorts where you and your new-to-the-sport partner can find downhill harmony By Ron C. Judd You share private moments, swap toothbrushes, even exchange vows. Big deal. Agree on the perfect ski vacation, and people will…

Outside Magazine, 1999 Annual Travel Guide The Snowfinder First pick your place      Alta Ski Area, Utah Arapahoe Basin Ski Area, Colorado Aspen, Colorado Bear Valley Ski Area, California…

Outside magazine, December 1997 Solo Faces A black outdoorsman takes a wilderness census, and finds it disturbingly light By Eddy L. Harris Night was falling all around the dusty mountains of southeastern Utah. It was a warm, clear…

Outside magazine, January 1996 Skills: Perfecting the Safer Ski Spill By Scott Sutherland If you subscribe to the same code of inflated alpine honor as I do, to fall is to fail–something to be avoided at all costs, even if it means flailing wildly…

Outside magazine, April 1995 Expeditions: Yet More Souls On Ice By Todd Balf Late last December, Liv Arnesen, a former schoolteacher from Oslo, Norway, became the first woman to reach the South Pole alone. Beginning at Hercules Inlet, near Patriot Hills, she skied 745…

Winter Travel Guide 1996 The Alps: The Poor Man’s Zermatt By Lorien Warner Olympic skiing gold medalist Mateja Svet was born here. Elan, a worldwide staple in ski equipment, is based here. This is a country that’s steeped in ski culture. Austria? No. Try…

Outside Magazine, 1999 Annual Travel Guide Crashing the High Life Because sometimes only a tri-level condo and saut‰ed elk medallions will do By Ron C. Judd Don’t be fooled by the first impressions when you hook up with the…

In the wake of a heli-skiing crash that killed his wife and three others and shattered his body, maverick filmmaker Mike Hoover has been left to rejoin the living the only way he knows how

Outside magazine, August 1996 Mountaineering: Tragedy at the Top of the World What really happened that fateful day? By Jeff Herr When you’ve just climbed to the top of Mount Everest, you want to linger there a few minutes, snapping photographs…

Outside magazine, February 1999 Skiing Even the hard core need, well, a hard core And While You’re At It … Do the following exercise to keep your legs tuned up on…

Outside magazine, April 1995 Skiing: It’s Good To Be Alberto…Once Again By Todd Balf Several years ago, Italy’s Alberto Tomba said that his dream slalom run included a glass of wine at the start, a cigarette on the way down, and a first-place finish…

Over 170 of the world’s best—and craziest—athletes tested their mettle at Crested Butte’s 2004 Saab U.S. Extreme Freeskiing Championships last month (February 25 through 28), each hoping to beat the competition with hair-raising runs down the mountain’s steep and technical Extreme Limits terrain. extreme skiing, Colorado Airborne at the…

I have a place in Vermont's Green Mountains and wondering what full metal-edged skis would work for skiing in the New England woods? I currently use the 170-centimeter Fischer E99, but is there a shorter ski that I can use for skiing logging roads, snowmobile tracks, and general rough in the woods? I don't think telemarks are the ticket as I'll be skiing on the flat, and I can use my E99's for any cross-country trails. Nigel New York City

Freeskier Seth Morrison, 30, thinks nothing of hucking off 60-foot mountain ledges. Snowboarder Keir Dillon, 26, routinely performs McTwists 15 feet above halfpipe lips. Speed skater Derek Parra, 33, powers around an ice oval at 25 miles per hour. All three are superb athletes, but which of them is the…

I'm considering buying the Makalu boot from La Sportiva for extended backpacking and mountaineering duties, thinking it would be flexible enough for backpacking yet stiff enough for some crampon work. I understand that for really cold winter climbing I'd want something insulated, but am I wrong in thinking the Makalu will be up to the task? Christopher Mountaintop, Pennsylvania

Expedition: Paragliding the Andes Teams: Will Gadd, Chris Santacroce, Othar Lawrence 0bjective: Fly Over the Spine of the Andes Duration: 19 Days Location: Northern Chile and Argentina

How Joe Simpson's best-selling thriller became a stunning film epic

Ten North American spas that will recharge your mind, body, and soul

When the frost bites hard, fight back with the latest winter hydration systems

I going on a ten-day whitewater rafting and kayaking trip this winter. I've just spent the last several months training for a marathon, but have virtually ignored my upper body. Can you offer me a good strengthening regimen so I'm not ready to cry after each day in the rapids? Alissa Mears Washington, D.C.

With the downhill ski season quickly approaching, I'm looking for a new shell-type jacket to replace my current insulated jacket, one that will work in almost any weather with appropriate layering (to be worn primarily in Vermont and New Hampshire, where rain is an occasional factor, but not a daily occurrence). Basically, I'm wondering if the $400-plus Gore-Tex jackets (like the Arc'Teryx Javelin SV or XCR Sidewinder SV) are really worth it, or if I'd be just as happy 99 percent of the time with a soft shell. Erik Hoboken, New Jersey

With the downhill ski season quickly approaching, I'm looking for a new shell-type jacket to replace my current insulated jacket, one that will work in almost any weather with appropriate layering (to be worn primarily in Vermont and New Hampshire, where rain is an occasional factor, but not a daily occurrence). Basically, I'm wondering if the 400-plus Gore-Tex jackets (like the Arc'Teryx Javelin SV or XCR Sidewinder SV) are really worth it, or if I'd be just as happy 99 percent of the time with a soft shell. Erik Hoboken, New Jersey

It's ok—relax. We've got your big holiday score all wrapped up: the latest shiny new toys, sharp tools, and smokin' threads to help you keep you adventure resolutions.

What do you get when you bus two dozen high school seniors from the Nebraska flatlands to the peaks of Colorado for their first winter trip to the Rockies? You get an all-American rite of passage, gangsta rap, and terror on the bunny slope. You get kissy-face, rough surf in the hot tub, flaming stogies, brazen thongs, and a blizzard of memories that will last f

A journey to the cradle of climbing reveals a strange new alpine environment, where glaciers are melting, mountains are falling, and nothing is as it was

In the nearly 30 years I've been hiking, biking, skiing, climbing, and kayaking, I've gone through a lot of gear. Most of it has been pretty good (like my Eureka Sentinel tent of a dozen years ago—heavy, but sturdy and roomy). Some of it has been pretty awful (like the…

I have a Canon Rebel 2000 that I want to take when I go skiing, but I'm worried about it not being able to handle the cold or the impact if I fall on my back. I will be carrying it in a medium-sized daypack. How can I keep it safe and warm? Matt Glastonbury, Connecticut

As a beginner skier living just one hour from Mount Hood, I'm trying to decide whether I should buy or just rent skis when I go; if I do buy, what equipment won't zero out my bank account? John Portland, Oregon

Any recommendations for a beginner's telemarking setup (skis, boots, skins, bindings) to use on groomed downhill runs and backcountry trips? I also recently bought a used Mountainsmith sled in the hope of taking my toddler up and down some trails at a local ski resort. Can this sled handle this type of use or I putting my kid's life in danger? Wayne Cleveland, Ohio

What's the deal with trekking poles? I seem to be the only one hiking without them. Are adjustability and shock absorption really worth the extra money? Or can I get away with using the beat-up downhill ski poles I bought at my neighbor's garage sale for $2? Kristen Seattle, Washington

I a strong trail/road runner and interested in doing some snowshoe racing this winter. I would like to buy something that I can use for training as well as racing. Could you give me a few options? Robert Grandville, Michigan

Slicing through powder at Copper Mountain Q: Can you tell me which ski areas open the earliest? Would it be worth making a trip to snag some early turns or am I better off waiting? — Heidi Hagemeier, Bend, Oregon Adventure Advisor:…

I'm trying to find a pair of cross-country skis that I can use on and off groomed trails. Does such a pair exist? Thanks! Jenni Juneau, Alaska

Brothers Tom (the good son) and Jerry (the bad seed) are about to join their fellow flatlanders for a zero-to-60 weekend of skiing and snowboarding at a skyscraping resort two miles above sea level. Watch as they confront the pitfalls of poor preparation, altitude sickness, dehydration, muscle fatigue, and draft beer. With this survival guide, we'll show you, w

To maximize the return on your investment in wanderlust, you need know-how and solid advice. We’re here to help. From saving on destination packages and high-value gear to insider trips and the bet reasons to blow a bundle, we’ve got the lowdown on affordable, rip-roaring, full-value adventure travel.

READY TO GRAB FRESH BIG AIR? We’ve got hemispheres of the white stuff—and timely beta on boosting your stamina, choosing the right equipment, and finding singular steeps close to home. Who says winter ever needs to end? Get Out There For more great worldwide skiing and snowboarding destinations,…

“Schoening leaned into his ax and braced himself for the impact. The rope thinned, then drew taut as a steel wire. For the next five minutes, he kept six men from falling of the face of the mountain.”

Outside Magazine, November 2003 Table of Contents

You recommend the Marmot Equinox as a three-season tent, but will this work for winter camping when temps hit the mid-20s and 30s? I'm looking at some convertible tents (Mountain Hardwear's Skyview 2, Marmot Swallow 2, and The North Face's Nebula), as well as non-convertible options like the Equinox and TNF's Roadrunner 2. Thanks, I just started reading your column and really appreciate the insight. Alexis Syracuse, New York

How is weight training for snowboarding different from weight training for skiing? Anne Davis Boulder, Colorado

I get sunburned every time I go skiing. What SPF should I be looking for in my sunblock? Dian Goodspeed Albany, New York

I'm an improving intermediate skier who will ski practically everything on the mountain—though not always gracefully! I'm looking for a pair of skis that won't hinder me as I progress, but that won't be too advanced for my current skill level. What do you recommend? Joel Manhasset, New York

I seek your vast wisdom in selecting a small pack for the upcoming ski season; something comfy but lightweight that can pull double duty for lift-access skiing and limited backcountry use. I'd prefer a low profile pack under 1,800 cubic inches, with some sort of attachment point for skis as well as hydration-bladder compatibility. Also, do you think a panel loader would be better suited for this type of pack, thereby eliminating the need for a top pocket that might flop around when not completely filled? I asking for too much here? Joe Victor, New York

All I want for Christmas is a good headlp for winter use, but things have gotten complex. Voltage regulators, duo headlps, multiple settings, alkaline versus lithium batteries: these have all muddied what should have been a simple choice. Basically, what's the perfect headlp for an overnight or multi-day winter backpacking trip? Scott Maple Valley, Washington

I need some of your sage wisdom: As a pretty serious mountain biker and alpine skier looking to the approaching winter, I want to score a hard shell that will serve me both on the trails and the slopes. I've looked at Patagonia, Cloudveil, The North Face, and Lowe Alpine, but I'm lost in the many options. I want something that breathes well, keeps me dry in wet conditions. Insulation ain't important (got a great Patagonia fleece already). Please, point me in the right direction! Nathan Washington, D.C.

These days it seems pretty much everybody's wearing bike helmets. Why can't you say the se for skiing helmets? And, do you think it'd be wise to shell out on a ski helmet? I've just booked up for a one-week ski trip to Colorado next February. Not having done much skiing before, I want to enjoy myself but also stay safe! Andrew Charlottesville, Virginia

When it comes to winter, downhill isn't the only direction