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Fall Special: The Indoor Climber's Guide to Gear, Training, and Access

Meet the toughest wall rats ever. Some of them are still redpointing routes (fused ankles and broken backs notwithstanding). Or running their own companies. Or passing the torch to young acolytes. A portrait gallery of American climbing's greatest generation.

Has this tired old world been explored-out? Not Down Under, where uncharted, bottomless slot canyons hide just west of Sydney.

There's nothing more all-American than a long summer road trip—except maybe a long summer road trip sponsored by a kayak company. Meet the hard-drivin', trick-huckin', heart-throbbin' river punks that may just turn freestyle kayaking into whitewater's answer to snowboarding.

New-school nomads pedal the singletrack of the ancients on the first mountain-biking trip to northern Mongolia

So, feeling like a plunge down a Himalayan river, a race up the face of a Patagonian spire, or a ski expedition to the North (or South—that's O.K. too) Pole? Feeling a little scared? That's why we call them Tough Trips.

Guy Waterman had climbed every peak in the Northeast high country—in winter, and from all the cardinal directions. With his wife, he had co-authored four scrupulously principled books on New England wilderness, and he was revered as the conscience of the mountains, a beloved teacher and friend, a paragon of Yankee self-reliance. Why, then, did he hike to the top of his favorite peak on the coldest day of the year and lie down to die?

The Adventurist: My Life in Dangerous Places, by Robert Young Pelton; The Snakebite Survivors' Club: Travels Among Serpents, by Jeremy Seal; Teewinot: A Year in the Grand Tetons, by Jack Turner; and The Water in Between, by Kevin Patterson.

It’s not easy to add up all the ways in which Lance Armstrong has earned the title of American hero. Lance Armstrong Lance Armstrong First he was the fiery phenom, a brilliant athlete on the brink of greatness. Then he showed us the vulnerable, terrified, but always…

So is adventure racing pure competition, or just a grueling way to grab TV ratings?

Outside Magazine, March 2000 Table of Contents

The peaks of the Italian Alps may look daunting, but climbing them is la dolce vita.

After all the bad weather, bad luck, and bad food, there was only one thing left for the publishers and producers of the next big adventure blockbuster to do: Kill the writer.

Come ski Mad River Glen, where it is resolved that progress is not a good thing—and that man-made snow is for sissies

Last winter was among the deadliest avalanche seasons on record in the United States and Europe. Why is the number of fatalities rising? And what's being done about it?

It takes a brave heart, a keen interest in cryogenics, and a thick coating of neoprene to climb into an iceboat and fly across a frozen lake at upwards of 60 miles per hour. But hey, hard-water sailors don't mind. What else would they do with all their free time?

They were mountaineering's best and brightest. Three decades later, their story hangs over the Montana Rockies like a winter mist.

Avalanche-safety wisdom to help you survive with the fittest

A partner drops out, one thing leads to another, and suddenly our hero finds that peer pressure has him fighting for his life

A corps of rock rats in a hurry is putting the pedal to the mettle in big-wall climbing

A Wetland Restoration Comedy: how one man transformed vile, polluted, dank little swamp into the perfect glassy ice pond

An avalanche in Tibet takes the life of Alex Lowe

A Definitive Directory to the Top Careers in the Outdoors

Books to upgrade your coffee table, featuring photography by NASA's Apollo astronauts, mountaineering legend Vittorio Sella, Glen Canyon chronicler Tad Nichols, and wildlife portraitist James Balog, along with Patagonia moments, Jane Goodall's chimps, and the world's most disgusting foods.

Way, way out in the land of powder, the cornices are steeper, the trails go deeper, and the crowds are nonexistent. Where is this mythical kingdom, you ask? Right here in North America.

The newest ski shapes will turn a lot more than your head

A tight crew of out-of-bounds crazies has been working overtime to turn the snow-flick world upside down with its relentlessly spectacular reels. Is it art or is it ski porn?

A tight crew of out-of-bounds crazies has been working overtime to turn the snow-flick world upside down with its relentlessly spectacular reels. Is it art or is it ski porn?

In an exclusive excerpt from the forthcoming book by the men who led the quest to solve the mystery of George Mallory's disappearance, the authors for the first time reveal the evidence they uncovered—and offer their chilling re-creation of Mallory and Irvine's last hours.

Soaring over four continents, three oceans, and assorted hostile nations aboard a high-tech gondola, Bertrand Piccard of Switzerland and Brian Jones of England this year became the first men to circle the world by hot-air balloon. Here is their diary—the unforgettable highs, the lows, and the humdrum routine experienced by the unlikely duo who vowed to boldly g

New School Skiing is teaching good old hotdogging some radical new tricks

It may be cold, it may be impossibly vast and empty, but in its first hours of existence, Canada's newborn Inuit territory proves that there's nothing so liberating as home rule.

Outside Magazine, March 1999 Table of Contents

This year's World Extreme Skiing Championships will feature two types of descent: Hail Mary and Mother of God

Swing a hammer, light a fuse, and let the dams come tumbling down. So goes the cry these days on American rivers, where vandals of every stripe—enviros and fishermen and interior secretaries, among others—wage battle to uncork the nation's bound-up waters.

Alaskan eccentric Trigger Twigg attempts the first winter ascent of the world's tallest face

Seven Olympic venues, one charming Main Street, and a host of High Peaks—it all adds up to Lake Placid, America's original snowbound resort.

The Great Reinhold Messner unmasks his latest conquest

Think Whistler is the only thing that British Columbia has to offer? Think again.

Can you feel it coming? Heat, hail, snow, rain. Wind, drought, flood, pain. Are you tired of waiting? Then hurry to Bangladesh, where the skies have already broken.

"He is for sure not one of us," says a teammate of ski racer Hermann Maier. "He is beyond this world," says a former gold medalist. "He is a beast," they say, and finally, "He is the beast."

It's surprising how far a ten-inch craft can carry you

Heed those rusty hinges now, and they'll work more smoothly when it really counts

A modest bit of indoor dedication now will give you the freedom to let loose this winter

Outside Magazine, September 1997 Table of Contents

Outside Magazine, August 1997 Table of Contents

Is the past doomed to be repeated?

After a lifetime of wanting, Jon Krakauer made it to the world's highest point. What he and the other survivors would discover in the months to come, however, is that it's even more difficult to get back down.

Outside Magazine, March 1996 Table of Contents

It outclasses the Alps. It nurtures budding friendships. It even makes your brain grow. A journey along the high route, America's finest backcountry trek.

Snowboarder Jeremy Jones seeks out the biggest and most remote lines in the latest film by Teton Gravity Research, Further. It premiers in the fall of 2012.

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