South America


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From remote wilderness resorts to a ski-in, ski-out hotel, these properties care as much about environmental practices as they do guest amenities

There's been limited research on the risks kids face in thin air, which means parents and guides have to make some tough decisions

The Points Guy is hooking up one fortunate traveler with $13,000 worth of airline points

Arizona's Mt. Graham was always there to climb. We just had to stop and do it.

Make popping a squat as painless and embarrassment-free as possible

Aniceto Almeida rode his bike more than 3,000 miles to the Atacama Crossing desert race without an entry spot. Vladmi Virgilio, a blind ultrarunner, showed up without a guide. Both trusted that it would all work out.

Think ahead, travel right—and for goodness' sake, bring clean water

Growing research debunks the myth that the paleo movement replicates the diet of our ancestors. Here's what they were actually eating.

On March 30, the five kayakers launched their boats at the village of La Tunia, attempting to make the first descent of the Rio Apaporis over 30 days. Twenty-one days and 500 miles later, FARC rebels ended it.

A guide to the places where glory will be won—and where the victors will live, sleep, and train

Even if you’re not traveling from Los Angeles to Patagonia by way of 13 countries like this writer did, you’ll want to add his travel resources to your to-meet and to-read list

This month, German Freya Hoffmeister became the first kayaker to circumnavigate the continent, paddling through everything from gale-force winds to ship-clogged canals.

These adventure geniuses will make your next trip the one you never, ever forget.

Stronger dollar? Check. Weaker euro? Check. Time to go see the world again!

The pro traveler needs cutting-edge survival gear as he explorers the farthest reaches of the planet. And his favorite place to play might surprise you. (Hint: It’s in the Midwest.)

Mountains, water, and Incan myths collide in this Peruvian playground.

Explorer Daniel Fox has paddled some of the world's wildest places in search of images that can reconnect us with nature—but not humanize it. His startling Wild Image Project brings wildlife up close and personal, asking viewers to reconsider their relationship with the environment. "Nature is raw, rough, cruel, pretty, beautiful, inspiring, but above all, a humble experience," Fox says. And that's a great thing.

For one young chief, protecting his people means embracing ecotourism.

Climate change is opening up more than ice fields—it's stoking a new tourism economy.

These images, from some of Outside's favorite photographers, will make you want to pack your bags and get lost in adventure.

Desertification is out of control, but there may be a way to stop it

Outside chooses the top vacation spots of the year

I want to climb one of the Seven Summits and have narrowed the list to Aconcagua or Kilimanjaro. I’m in excellent shape and an experienced hiker, but not a mountaineer. Which one would you recommend?

A decade before his death, Sun Myung Moon—multimillionaire founder of the controversial Unification Church—sent a band of followers deep into the wilds of Paraguay, with orders to build the ultimate utopian community and eco-resort. So how’s that working out? Monte Reel machetes his way toward heaven on Earth.

When the Reverend Sun Myung Moon died in September, at age 92, obituaries described a man who'd inspired zealous devotion and condemnation—a summation that Moon never shied away from. "I am a controversial person," he wrote in his 2009 autobiography, As a Peace-Loving Global Citizen. "The mere mention of my name causes trouble in the world." Here's a loo

How to get there, when to go, and where to stay

Michael Wigge has made two trips around the world: For one, he relied on strangers for food and accommodation; for the other, he bartered, trading a single apple for, eventually, a home in Hawaii, which he now owns. We caught up with him before his next adventure.

Gunther Holtorf, a 75-year-old former airline CEO who has driven more than 820,000 kilometers over the past two decades, doesn't care if you remember his travels. But you better respect Otto, his G Wagon that will be placed in a museum if it makes it through this final leg.

Giant mining companies are tearing up some of the wildest places on earth to feed our hunger for gold. But do we even need it?

What started as a simple idea four years ago finally ended last week when Graham Hughes became the first person to visit all 201 countries without setting foot on an airplane

Ski filmmaker Nick Waggoner talks to Caty Enders about losing two friends while producing Solitaire, the story of a ski pilgrimage through South America

A guy calls, says he found some mysterious papers left behind by a dead relative who apparently shrunk human heads and bodies. Do we wanna come see? Uh, no. But we knew Mary Roach would.

Our favorite flicks from Canada’s premier adventure film fest

How does ultrarunner Ray Zahab—who became famous for expeditions traversing the harshest terrain on earth—up the ante? By taking high school kids on his next series of trips.

South America contains the Amazon, the Andes, 19,000 miles of coastline, and arguably more adventure than any other continent. So where to start? These ten perfect trips, from exploratory rafting in Peru to skiing in Chile to beach-hopping Brazil.

Chase your travel dreams with 48 handpicked adventures guaranteed to satisfy every type of wandering soul

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