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Pull your van or RV into the cheapest slopeside lodging you can find: an overnight parking space

From Washington to California, here are nine of our favorite short treks along the famous route

Two friends abandoned promising careers to pursue a bold adventure. It went terribly wrong—but also right.

'Ode to Desolation' introduces us to Jim Henterly, who spends his summers stationed at the historic Desolation Peak Fire Lookout

All across the country, major cities are making it easier to access nature with vibrant greenways

'Rising from the Ashes' follows the scientists studying the summer steelhead resurgence in Washington's Elwha River

In his new photo book "Errors of Possession," adventure photographer Garrett Grove documents the region's shifting industries and culture

With the airline industry struggling because of COVID-19, summer, fall, and winter plane fares to adventure destinations are hitting unprecedented lows. Airlines are also offering free change and cancellation fees. Should you hop on these deals now or wait and see? We consulted industry experts to find out—and rounded up some of the best fares out there.

While researching his new book 'Author in Chief,' our contributor discovered a forgotten piece of John Adams's life: the time he sailed to Europe during the Revolutionary War and barely survived

'The Recipe' features pro skier Ingrid Backstrom shredding on her home turf in Washington

'Too Much?' profiles filmmaker Anne Cleary reflecting on a series of decisions that led her to the mountains

The six most doable ski descents in North America, according to pro skier Cody Townsend and ski mountaineer Noah Howell

According to Craig Romano, the local guy who literally wrote the book—actually, 20 of them—on hiking in the area

Plus: where to stay, eat, and play outside along the way

You can get away on a dime at this time of year

Here's what the expanded regulations mean for thru-hikers next year

Forget haunted houses and corn mazes. Head out to the woods instead, where the real scares await.

The Emerald City is surrounded by mountains and has access to the ocean, but some of its biggest outdoor draws can be reached by public transportation

Four urban centers that have all the makings of an epic adventure town—without the hype

'Wild Olympics' is a tribute to the pristine rivers of Washington's Olympic Peninsula

From tubing to trail running, pro athletes describe the best way to get outside in their hometowns

Everything the national parks could afford to do with the money Trump's celebration took from them

Seattle has a lot to offer city folk—a thriving job market, world-class culture, and all the pour-over coffee you can drink. But for those who need frequent and fast escapes from the metropolis, the shores and woods of Puget Sound's islands are only a boat ride away.

Through Quiet Parks International, Gordon Hempton hopes to save the earth’s few truly natural soundscapes

'Phenomenal Noumenal Wonderful' is a four-year project designed to highlight the beautiful landscapes of the Pacific Northwest

Crews carry your gear and provide meals and campsites as you cruise through some of America's most scenic back roads

Violinist-pianist duo Anastasia Allison and Rose Freeman hike into the wilderness and often play for no audience other than nature

Here's where the pioneering skier sends it when she's not shredding the backcountry

Todd Carmichael runs the billion-dollar La Colombe Coffee empire, but he still makes time for record-breaking jaunts across Antarctica

The little orca known as Scarlet is dead. Will her death be a turning point for the Northwest's endangered Southern Resident killer whales? Washington State governor Jay Inslee is proposing strong action.

A former National Park Service ranger on why now, more than ever, national parks need protection from Washington's budget fights

From the filmmakers at Mad Trees, ‘We Heard You Need Gloves’ features a group of female shredders ripping up the terrain at Mount Baker.

"What I've been searching for, I now see, is something bigger than acceptance, bigger than smokejumping, bigger than proving I can be one of the guys."

It's easier than ever to jump on a bus, bike, train, or trolley to climb, paddle, hike, and camp

Can recent events be chalked up to the occasional confusion of bureaucracy? Or is something more worrisome afoot?

Even as Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke has said he wants to give states more decision-making power over federal lands, the Trump administration has taken numerous steps to limit public input

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